THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK / ALBANY, NY 12234

 

TO:

EMSC-VESID Committee

FROM:

Jean C. Stevens

SUBJECT:

2004-05 Annual Report on the Status of Charter Schools in New York State

 

DATE:

June 1, 2006

 

STRATEGIC GOAL:

Goals 1 and 2

 

AUTHORIZATION(S):

 

 

 

Summary

 

Issue for Decision

 

          Should the Regents approve the proposed 2004-05 report on charter schools?

 

Reason for Consideration

 

          Required by State statute, §2857(3) of the Education Law.

         

Proposed Handling

 

          This question will come before the Regents EMSC-VESID Committee on June 19, 2006 for discussion and action.

 

Procedural History

 

          A report of the status of charter schools in New York State has been approved by the Board annually for submission to the Governor and Legislature starting in 2000.  A five-year report was also submitted and approved by the Board at your December 2003 meeting. 

 


Background Information

 

          The Board needs to review the attached report and determine if it wishes to make any changes in policy as a result of the findings, and/or make any recommendations to the Governor and the Legislature.   Potential recommendations are provided. 

 

Recommendation

 

          VOTED:  That the Board of Regents approve the 2004-05 Annual Report to the Governor, the Temporary President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the Assembly on the Status of Charter Schools in New York State.

 

Timetable for Implementation

 

          Not applicable.

 

 

Attachment


 

 


ANNUAL REPORT TO THE

GOVERNOR,

THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE,

THE SPEAKER OF THE ASSEMBLY

AND

THE BOARD OF REGENTS

ON THE STATUS OF CHARTER SCHOOLS IN NEW YORK STATE

2004-05

 

 

JUNE  2006

 

 

 

 

 

THE

UNIVERSITY

OF THE

STATE

OF

NEW YORK

 

 

 

 

THE STATE

EDUCATION

DEPARTMENT

 

 

 


Background and Introduction

 

          The New York Charter Schools Act, now Article 56 of the Education Law, was enacted on December 17, 1998.  This Act amended existing Education Law to allow for the creation of charter schools.  The stated purpose of the Article “is to authorize a system of charter schools to provide opportunities for teachers, parents, and community members to establish and maintain schools that operate independently of existing schools and school districts in order to accomplish the following objectives:

 

(a)  Improve student learning and achievement;

(b)  Increase learning opportunities for all students, with special emphasis on expanded learning experiences for students who are at risk of academic failure;

(c)   Encourage the use of different and innovative teaching methods;

(d)  Create new professional opportunities for teachers, school administrators and other school personnel;

(e)  Provide parents and students with expanded choices in the types of educational opportunities that are available within the public school system; and

(f)    Provide schools with a method to change from rule-based to performance-based accountability systems by holding the schools established under this article accountable for meeting measurable student achievement results”(§2850(2) of Education Law).

 

Article 56 also requires the Board of Regents to report annually to the Governor, the Temporary President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the Assembly on the status of charter schools in New York State (§2857(3) of Education Law).  This report covers the 2004-05 school year.

 

This report includes data submitted by the charter schools and local school districts. 


Executive Summary

 

This report provides data required by §2857(3) of the Education Law and covers the 2004-05 school year, during which a total of 61 charter schools were open for instruction.  Of these 61 schools, 16 were chartered by the Board of Regents, 32 were chartered by the Board of Trustees of the State University of New York (“SUNY”), 11 were chartered by the Chancellor of the New York City Public Schools, and two were chartered by the Board of Education of the Buffalo City School District. Twenty-one had management companies as partners.  There were six charter schools with Edison Schools, Inc. as a partner, four schools each with Victory Schools, Inc. and National Heritage Academies as a partner, three schools with Chancellor Beacon Academies as a partner, and one school each with SABIS, Lighthouse Academies, Uncommon Schools, Inc. and Mosaica Education Inc. as a management partner. There were 32 charter schools located in New York City, 12 in Buffalo, four in Rochester, three in Albany, three in Syracuse, and one each in East Hampton (Wainscott Common School District), Kenmore, Lackawanna, Riverhead, Roosevelt, Schenectady, and Troy.  The largest student enrollment reported was 1,105 at the Charter School of Science and Technology in Rochester, and the smallest was 88 at the Child Development Center of the Hamptons Charter School in Wainscott.  There were 36 schools that served  elementary students (i.e., K-6) in a variety of grade configurations (e.g., K-1, K-2). Seven served students in grades K-8, three served students in grades K-7, two served students in grades K-9, two served students in grades 5-6, and two schools served students in grade 9 only. Finally, one each served students in grades 5-10, 7-9, K and 6, 5-6, 8-12, 5-8, 6-7, 7-10, and K-12. 

 

The charters for three charter schools were not renewed by SUNY past the 2004-05 school year.  The schools that were closed are the Central New York Charter School for Math and Science (Syracuse), the Charter School of Science and Technology  (Rochester),, and the Rochester Leadership Academy Charter School (Rochester).  

 

According to the Basic Educational Data System (BEDS) forms that were submitted in October 2004, a total of 18,408 students were reported enrolled in these 61 charter schools during 2004-05.  Most (12,634) were reported as Black (not Hispanic origin) and the fewest (65) were reported as being American Indian or Alaskan Native.  There were 255 Asian or Pacific Islander students reported. Hispanics made up the second largest population, with 3,059 students enrolled. The number of White (not Hispanic origin) students was reported to be 2,395.  In grades K and 1, there were more Black (not Hispanic) students reported as being enrolled (3,762) than there were students in any other ethnic group in grades K-12. 

Most students (15,305) were enrolled in grades K-6, while 3,103 were enrolled in grades 7-12. No students were reported as “Ungraded Secondary” but five students were reported as “Ungraded Elementary.”  Among the elementary students, most (9,737) continue to be enrolled in grades K-3.  Enrollment in grades 4-6 was 5,563.  Grade 6 had the lowest enrollment (1,612) at the elementary level.  At the secondary level, most students (1,915) continue to be enrolled in grades 7 and 8, but the enrollment gap between grades 7 - 8 and grades 9-12 is decreasing as several charter schools expand or are created to serve high school students.  In 2004-05, 1,188 students were enrolled in grades 9-12. 

 

Fiscal impact is calculated using the number of students reported on each charter school’s BEDS form multiplied by the adjusted expense per pupil (AEP) for that district.  That figure is then compared with the annual operating budget of the resident district and a percent is derived.  This figure may be different from what the districts actually pay to a charter school since such payments are based upon a full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollment figure that must be derived per Commissioner’s Regulation 119.1.  Those FTEs are not reported herein since final reconciliation of payments occurs in July of each year and the data are not readily available.  The figures reported herein are a reasonable estimate, however, of the potential fiscal impact upon any district.

 

Overall fiscal impact in New York City appeared to be negligible (0.30 percent impact on the district budget). In 2004-05, fiscal impact ranged from .01 percent of the school budget for several school districts with a small number of students attending charter schools to 10.15 percent of the Albany City School District budget.  Cumulative impact was 8.25 percent on the Lackawanna City School District budget, 7.77 percent on the Buffalo City School District budget, 4.52 percent on the Roosevelt Union Free School District, 4.06 percent on the Rochester City School District budget, 3.64 percent on the Schenectady City School District, 3.27 percent on the Shelter Island Union Free School District, 3.18 percent on the Syracuse City School District, 3.17 percent on the Sagaponack Common School District, 3.03 percent impact on the Wainscott Common School District, and 2.07 percent impact on the Troy City School District budget.

According to the information provided by the financial audits, 15 schools had a decrease in unrestricted net assets (i.e., fund balance) for the year.   The total amount of Revenue and Support for the charter schools totaled $186.6 million.  Government contracts and grants accounted for 89 percent of the total Revenue and Support.  

Academic achievement, as measured by State exams, was mixed.  For those schools for which the 2004-05 school year was the first year of instruction in the grades assessed, the test results should be interpreted as a baseline by which all future test results will be judged. 

On the grade 4 English Language Arts (ELA) exam, the top performers were as follows (percentages are for the percent of students scoring at or above Level 3):

§       Harlem Day Charter School, New York City: 100.0%

§       Renaissance Charter School, New York City: 95.7%

§       Roosevelt Children’s Academy Charter School, Roosevelt: 87.3%

§       Carl C. Icahn Charter School, New York City: 86.2%

§       Genesee Community Charter School, Rochester: 83.8%%

On the grade 4 English Language Arts exam, the weakest performers were as follows (percentages are for the percent of students scoring at or above Level 3):

§       Pinnacle Charter School, Buffalo (baseline year): 18.4%

§       Stepping Stone Academy Charter School, Buffalo: 20.4%

§       Brooklyn Excelsior Charter School, New York City: 29.9%

§       COMMUNITY Charter School, Buffalo: 32.5%

§       Charter School of Science and Technology, Rochester: 33.9%

On the grade 4 math exam, the top performers were as follows (percentages are for the percent of students scoring at or above Level 3):

§       Carl C. Icahn Charter School, New York City: 100.0%

§       International Charter School of Schenectady, Schenectady, 100.0%

§       Tapestry Charter School, Buffalo: 100.0%

§       Our World Neighborhood Charter School, New York City: 95.8%

§       Harlem Day Charter School, New York City: 94.4%

§       Renaissance Charter School, New York City: 92.0%

§       Roosevelt Children’s Academy Charter School, Roosevelt: 91.8%

§       Genesee Community Charter School, Rochester, 90.7%

On the grade 4 math exam, the weakest performers were as follows (percentages are for the percent of students scoring at or above Level 3):

§       Stepping Stone Academy Charter School, Buffalo: 33.9%

On the grade 8 ELA exam, the top performer was as follows (percentages are for the percent of students scoring at or above Level 3):

§       KIPP Academy Charter School, New York City: 71.5%

On the grade 8 ELA exams, the weakest performers were as follows (percentages are for the percent of students scoring at or above Level 3):

§       John V. Lindsay Wildcat Academy Charter School, New York City: 8.3%

 

§       Buffalo Academy of Science Charter School, Buffalo: 13.6%

 

§       Enterprise Charter School, Buffalo: 16.3%

 

§       Stepping Stone Academy Charter School, Buffalo: 20.0%

 

§       Charter School for Applied Technologies, Kenmore-Tonawanda: 27.3%

 

Based upon their 2004-05 State assessment date, five charter schools have been identified as being furthest from State standards.  They are:

§       Ark Community Charter School, Troy: grade 4 ELA;

 

§       Enterprise Charter School, Buffalo: grade 8 math;

 

§       John V. Lindsay Wildcat Academy Charter School, NYC: HS ELA and HS math.

 

§       Pinnacle Charter School, Buffalo: grade 4 ELA; and

 

§       Stepping Stone Academy Charter School, Buffalo: grade 4 ELA and grade 4 math.

 

Results for the 2001 grade 9 cohort show that most students (60.6 percent) in the John V. Lindsay Wildcat Academy Charter School did not take the Regents English exam, while 17.1 percent of the students scored between 0 and 64, and 22.2 percent scored between 65 and 100.  For the Regents math exam, most students (80.8 percent) did not take the exam, while 10.1 percent scored between 0 and 64, while 9.1 percent scored between 65 and 84. 

Most students in the Renaissance Charter School (81.4 percent) did take the Regents English exam.  The results show that 23.0 percent scored between 0 and 64, while 74.4 percent scored between 65 and 100.   The results for the Regents math exam show that all students attending the Renaissance Charter School took the exam, with 38.5 percent scoring between zero and 64, and 61.6 percent scoring between 65 and 100. 

In the 2004-05 school year, the charter schools reported serving a total of 358 English language learners, with 343 being enrolled in grade K-6 and the remaining 15 students enrolled in grades 7-12.

A total of 1,502 students with disabilities were reported in grades K-12, representing nine percent of the student enrollment in charter schools.  The Child Development Center of the Hamptons Charter School had the largest percentage of students with disabilities, 48 of its 88 students (55 percent).

 

A total of 11,555 students receiving Free or Reduced Lunch were reported, representing 63 percent of all students attending a New York State charter school during 2004-05.   Of that number, 9,903 were reported at the K-6 level, and 1,652 were reported at the 7-12 level.

During the 2004-05 school year, a total of 1,445 students were reported as having transferred out of charter schools and into other educational settings.  Of the 1,445, 1,331 transferred into another public school, and 114 were reported as having transferred into a non-public school or to home instruction. 

Charter schools reported serving 23 homeless students, and two migrant students. 

Additional information is provided that describes many of the issues and concerns that have been raised regarding the implementation of Article 56, the New York Charter Schools Act.  Suggestions are made for possible amendments to the legislation.    


The Number, Distribution, and Brief Description of New Charter Schools Operating in New York State in 2004-05

 

          Table 1 provides information for each charter school open for instruction during the 2004-05 school year and includes the grades and number of students to be served, the management company (if applicable), the specific educational approach to be used, the date that instruction commenced, and the charter entity.

 

Table 2 shows the distribution of students reported enrolled by grade, ethnicity, and gender.

 


Table 1

Approved Charter Schools Open for Instruction in New York State During 2004-05

Name and Address

New or Conversion

District of Location

Grades Served

Total Number of Students

Management Company

Educational Approach

Opening Date

Charter Entity

Amber Charter School

220 East 106th Street

New York, NY 10029

New

NYC (CSD 4)

K-5

280

None

Leonard Bernstein Center Artful Learning Model; dual language immersion (Spanish/English)

9/00

SUNY

Ark Community Charter School

762 River Street

Troy, NY 12180-1230

New

Troy

K-5

140

None

Essential Questions; commitment to theory of multiple intelligences

9/01

SUNY

Beginning with Children Charter School

11 Bartlett Street

Brooklyn, NY 11206-5001

Conversion

NYC (CSD 14)

K-8

450

None

Increased learning opportunities, continuous assessment

9/01

Chancellor

Brighter Choice Charter Schools for Boys

250 Central Avenue

Albany, NY 12206-2610

New

Albany

K-3

95

None

Liberal Arts, Core Knowledge

9/02

Regents

Brighter Choice Charter School for Girls

250 Central Avenue

Albany, NY 12206-2610

New

Albany

K-3

95

None

Liberal Arts, Core Knowledge

9/02

Regents

Bronx Charter School for Better Learning

3740 Baychester Avenue

Bronx, NY 10466-5031

New

NYC (CSD 11)

1-2

50

None

“Subordination of Teaching to Learning”

9/03

SUNY

Bronx Charter School for Children

388 Willis Avenue

Bronx, NY 10454-1303

New

NYC (CSD )

K-1

132

None

Literacy development

9/04

Regents


 

Name and Address

New or Conversion

District of Location

Grades Served

Total Number of Students

Management Company

Educational Approach

Opening Date

Charter Entity

Bronx Charter School for Excellence

1508 Webster Avenue

Bronx, NY 10457-8015

New

NYC (CSD 11)

K-1

100

None

Liberal arts, back-to-basics

9/04

SUNY

Bronx Charter School for the Arts

890 Garrison Avenue

Bronx, NY 10474-5354

New

NYC (CSD 8)

K-5

200

None

Arts education as a catalyst for academic and social success

9/03

Regents

Bronx Lighthouse Charter School

977 Fox Street

Bronx, NY 10459-3320

New

NYC (CSD 8)

K-2

120

Lighthouse Academies

Open Court reading, Saxon math, Full Option Science System, Core Knowledge

9/04

Chancellor

Bronx Preparatory Charter School

1508 Webster Avenue

Bronx, NY 10457

New

NYC (CSD 9)

5-10

350

None

Classical, college-preparatory curriculum

9/00

SUNY

Brooklyn Charter School

545 Willoughby Avenue

Brooklyn, NY 11233

New

NYC (CSD 16)

K-5

234

None

Project-based instruction

9/00

Chancellor

Brooklyn Excelsior Charter School

856 Quincy Street

Brooklyn, NY 11221-3612

New

NYC (CSD 15)

K-6

480

National Heritage Academies

Back-to-basics academics, character development

9/03

SUNY

Buffalo Academy of Science Charter School

15 Jewett Parkway

Buffalo, NY 14214-2319

New

Buffalo

7-9

225

None

Emphasis on math and science

9/04

Regents

Buffalo United Charter School

325 Manhattan Avenue

Buffalo, NY 14215

New

Buffalo

K-6

480

National Heritage Academies

Back-to-basics academics, character development

9/03

SUNY


 

Name and Address

New or Conversion

District of Location

Grades Served

Total Number of Students

Management Company

Educational Approach

Opening Date

Charter Entity

Carl C. Icahn Charter School

1525 Brook Avenue

Bronx, NY 10457-8005

New

NYC (CSD 9)

K-5

216

None

Core Knowledge

9/01

SUNY

Central New York Charter School for Math and Science

601 East Genesee Street

Syracuse, NY 13202

New

Syracuse

K-6

549

Chancellor Beacon Academies, Inc.

Core Knowledge

8/00

SUNY

Charter School for Applied Technologies

2303 Kenmore Avenue

Buffalo, NY 14207

New

Kenmore-Tonawanda

K-9

1,000

Edison Schools, Inc.

Integrated subject matter in five domains

9/01

Regents

Charter School of Science and Technology

690 St. Paul Street

Rochester, NY 14605

New

Rochester

K-8

1,100

Edison Schools, Inc.

Integrated subject matter in five domains

9/00

SUNY

Child Development Center of the Hamptons Charter School

175 Daniels Hole Road

Wainscott, NY 11975

New

Wainscott

K-6

85

None

Thematic approach in a community-based setting

1/01

SUNY

COMMUNITY Charter School

404 Edison Avenue

Buffalo, NY 14215-2936

New

Buffalo

K-5

275

Chancellor Beacon Academies, Inc.

Core Knowledge

9/03

Regents

Community Partnership Charter School

171 Clermont Avenue

Brooklyn, NY 11205

New

NYC (CSD 13)

K-5

350

None

Hands-on learning

9/00

SUNY

Enterprise Charter School

275 Oak Street

Buffalo, NY 14203-1638

New

Buffalo

K-9

460

None

Project-based; Constructivist

7/03

Buffalo BOE


 

 

Name and Address

New or Conversion

District of Location

Grades Served

Total Number of Students

Management Company

Educational Approach

Opening Date

Charter Entity

Eugenio Maria de Hostos Charter School

938 Clifford Avenue

Rochester, NY 14621

New

NYC (CSD 16)

K-1

88

Uncommon Schools, Inc.

Single-gender education for boys; literacy based; Core Knowledge

9/04

SUNY

 Excellence Charter School of Bedford Stuyvesant

598 Lafayette Avenue

3rd Floor

Brooklyn, NY 11216-1020

New

NYC (CSD 13)

K-2

152

None

Knowledge based on Bedford Stuyvesant YMCA I Have a Dream After-school Program

9/04

SUNY

Explore Charter School

15 Snyder Avenue

Brooklyn, NY 11226-4020

New

NYC (CSD 17)

K-5

240

None

Interdisciplinary with a focus on literacy.

9/02

Chancellor

Family Life Academy Charter School

14 West 170th Street

Bronx, NY 10452-3227

New

NYC (CSD 9)

K-4

219

None

English/Spanish immersion

9/01

SUNY

Genesee Community Charter School

657 East Avenue

Rochester, NY 14607-2177

New

Rochester

K-6

200

None

Expeditionary Learning-Outward Bound

9/01

Regents

Global Concepts Charter School

1001 Ridge Road

Lackawanna, NY 14218

New

Lackawanna

K-5

365

None

Global education, Success for All

9/02

Regents

Grand Concourse Academy Charter School

116-118 East 169th Street

Bronx, NY 10452-7704

New

NYC (CSD

K-2

175

None

Balanced literacy approach, Everyday Mathematics

9/04

SUNY


 

Name and Address

New or Conversion

District of Location

Grades Served

Total Number of Students

Management Company

Educational Approach

Opening Date

Charter Entity

Harbor Science and Arts Charter School

1 East 104th Street

New York, NY 10029

New

NYC (CSD 4)

K-8

196

None

Constructivist

9/00

SUNY

Harlem Children’s Zone Promise Academy Charter School

175 West 134th Street

New York, NY 10030

New

NYC (CSD 5)

K, 6

200

None

Literacy based, Open Court reading, Saxon math, arts enrichment

9/04

Chancellor

Harlem Day Charter School

240 East 123rd Street

New York, NY 10035-2038

New

NYC (CSD 4)

K-4

200

None

Core Knowledge

9/01

SUNY

Harlem Village Academy Charter School

413 E. 120th Street

New York, NY 10035

New

NYC (CSD 4)

5-6

125

None

Liberal arts

9/03

SUNY

Harriet Tubman Charter School

3565 Third Avenue

Bronx, NY 10456-3403

New

NYC (CSD 9)

K-6

250

Edison Schools, Inc.

Integrated subject matter in five domains

9/01

Regents

International Charter School of Schenectady

408 Eleanor Street

Schenectady, NY 12306-3122

New

Schenectady

K-5

425

SABIS

College preparatory

9/02

SUNY

John V. Lindsay Wildcat Academy Charter School

17 Battery Place

New York, NY 10004

Conversion

NYC (CSD 2)

8-12

485

None

Cooperative learning; thematic projects/units

9/00

Chancellor

King Center Charter School

938 Genesee Street

Buffalo, NY 14211-3025

New

Buffalo

K-4

100

None

Individualized

9/00

SUNY


 

Name and Address

New or Conversion

District of Location

Grades Served

Total Number of Students

Management Company

Educational Approach

Opening Date

Charter Entity

KIPP Academy Charter School

250 East 156th Street

Room 418

Bronx, NY 10451

Conversion

NYC (CSD 7)

5-8

240

None

Extended-day, college preparatory program

9/00

Chancellor

KIPP Sankofa Charter School

140 Central Park Plaza

Buffalo, NY 14214

New

Buffalo

5-6

180

None

Extended-day, college preparatory program

9/03

SUNY

KIPP S.T.A.R. College Preparatory Charter School

618 W. 138th Street

New York, NY 10031

New

NYC (CSD 5)

5-6

180

None

Extended-day, college preparatory program

9/03

SUNY

Merrick AcademyQueens Public Charter School

207-01 Jamaica Avenue

Queens Village, NY 11428

New

NYC (CSD 29)

K-6

450

Victory Schools, Inc.

Direct Instruction, Core Knowledge

9/00

SUNY

New Covenant Charter School

50 North Lark Street

Albany, NY 12210

New

Albany

K-6

911

Edison Schools, Inc.

Integrated subject matter in five domains

9/99

SUNY

Opportunity Charter School

222 West 134th Street

New York, NY 10030-3002

New

NYC (CSD 5)

6-7

108

None

Standards-based, Schools Attuned model, Balanced Literacy program

9/04

Chancellor

Our World Neighborhood Charter School

36-12 35th Avenue

Astoria, NY 11106

New

NYC (CSD 30)

K-7

600

Mosaica Education, Inc.

Constructivist, Core Knowledge

9/02

SUNY


 

Name and Address

New or Conversion

District of Location

Grades Served

Total Number of Students

Management Company

Educational Approach

Opening Date

Charter Entity

Peninsula Preparatory Academy Charter School

1110 Foam Place

Far Rockaway, NY 11691-4005

New

NYC (CSD 27)

K-2

150

Victory Schools, Inc.

Balanced literacy approach, Everyday Mathematics

9/04

Chancellor

Pinnacle Charter School

115 Ash Street

Buffalo, NY 14204

New

Buffalo

K-6

300

None

Coalition of Effective Schools

9/03

Regents

ReadNet Bronx Charter School

116 E. 63rd. Street

New York, NY 10021

New

NYC (CSD 7)

K-2

120

None

Skill-based, computer-assisted, individualized learning process

9/03

Regents

Renaissance Charter School

35-59 81st Street

Jackson Heights, NY 11372

Conversion

NYC (CSD 30)

K-12

500

None

Core studies, project-based learning, and community involvement

9/00

Chancellor

Riverhead Charter School

3685 Middle Country Road

Calverton, NY 11933

New

Riverhead

K-5

216

Edison Schools, Inc.

Integrated subject matter in five domains

9/01

Regents

Rochester Leadership Academy Charter School

1020 Maple Street

Rochester, NY 14604-1614

New

Rochester

K-8

648

National Heritage Academies

Back-to-basics academics, character development

9/00

SUNY

Roosevelt Children’s Academy Charter School

105 Pleasant Avenue

Roosevelt, NY 11575

New

Roosevelt

K-6

300

Victory Schools, Inc.

Direct Instruction and Core Knowledge

9/00

SUNY


 

Name and Address

New or Conversion

District of Location

Grades Served

Total Number of Students

Management Company

Educational Approach

Opening Date

Charter Entity

Sisulu Children’s Academy- Harlem Public Charter School

125 W. 115th Street

New York, NY 10026-2908

New

 

 

 

NYC (CSD 3)

K-5

225

Victory Schools, Inc.

Direct Instruction and Core Knowledge

9/99

SUNY

South Buffalo Charter School

2219 South Park Avenue

Buffalo, NY 14220

New

Buffalo

K-8

533

Beacon Educational Management, LLC

Core Knowledge

9/00

SUNY

Southside Academy Charter School

800 South Wilbur Avenue, Bldg. 1C

Syracuse, NY 13204

New

Syracuse

K-7

329

National Heritage Academies

Back-to-basics academics, character development

9/02

Regents

Stepping Stone Academy Charter School

907 East Ferry Street

Buffalo, NY 14211-1423

New

Buffalo

K-8

556

Edison Schools, Inc.

Integrated subject matter in five domains

9/01

SUNY

Syracuse Academy of Science Charter School

112 South Wilbur Avenue

Syracuse, NY 13204

New

Syracuse

7-10

250

None

College Preparatory; Tutoring

9/03

Regents

Tapestry Charter School

40 North Street

Buffalo, NY 14202-1106

New

Buffalo

K-7

192

None

Multi-age; Child Development Project; Work Sampling System

9/01

SUNY

Western New York Maritime Charter School

266 Genesee Street

Buffalo, NY 14203

New

Buffalo

9

150

None

Navy Junior ROTC

9/04

Regents


 

Name and Address

New or Conversion

District of Location

Grades Served

Total Number of Students

Management Company

Educational Approach

Opening Date

Charter Entity

Westminster Community Charter School

24 Westminster Street

Buffalo, NY 14215-1614

Conversion

Buffalo

K-8

500

None

Standards-based instruction using a language arts platform; classroom reading/writing workshops

9/04

Buffalo BOE

Williamsburg Charter High School

424 Leonard Street, 4th Floor

Brooklyn, NY 11222-3908

New

NYC (CSD 14)

9

125

None

Basic literacy; Liberal Arts and Critical Thinking; Comprehensive Youth Development.

9/04

Chancellor


Table 2

Student Enrollment by Grade, Ethnicity and Gender

Summary of Data Reported by All Charter Schools

2004-05

 

 


Grade

 

American Indian

 or

Alaskan Native

Black

(not

Hispanic origin)

Asian

 Or

Pacific Islander

 

Hispanic

White

(not

Hispanic origin)

 

Total

Enrollment

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Male

Female

Kindergarten (half-day)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Kindergarten (full-day)

3

5

981

897

28

17

220

225

175

151

1407

1295

First

5

10

902

982

14

19

226

197

165

176

1312

1384

Second

4

6

773

851

18

14

159

183

160

175

1114

1229

Third

3

4

672

739

12

13

144

123

151

135

982

1014

Fourth

5

3

664

760

11

8

128

129

130

150

938

1050

Fifth

2

1

684

747

11

8

138

156

115

101

950

1013

Sixth

2

2

538

589

10

10

139

146

94

82

783

829

Ungraded Elementary

0

0

3

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

2

Seventh

2

1

313

359

7

7

83

115

89

68

494

550

Eighth

1

4

267

302

5

3

70

73

79

67

422

449

Ninth

0

1

196

186

5

4

95

113

46

53

342

357

Tenth

1

0

58

61

3

5

35

53

12

5

109

124

Eleventh

0

0

31

35

3

9

22

28

3

2

59

74

Twelfth

0

0

20

22

9

2

22

37

4

7

55

68

Ungraded Secondary*

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Totals

28

37

6,102

6,532

136

119

1,481

1,578

1,223

1,172

8,970

9,438

Note: Ungraded Elementary and Ungraded Secondary refer to students with disabilities who spend 60% or more of their time in special education classes.  Ungraded students who are not students with disabilities should be assigned, according to age, to a grade above.


Fiscal and Programmatic Impact of Charter Schools

 

          Article 56 requires that this report contain information on the current and projected fiscal impact of charter schools on the delivery of services by the public school system.  Appendix A contains information obtained from the public school districts in which charter schools are located.  They were asked to provide such information from their point of view.  It was assumed that the districts themselves would be in the best position to ascertain what type and level of impact, if any, the charter schools had upon the districts. 

 

Table 3 shows the fiscal information for each charter school for the 2004-05 school year.  Included are reported sending districts, the number of students reported enrolled in charter schools (regardless of the charter school’s location) for the 2004-05 school year, the adjusted expense per pupil (AEP) for the 2004-05 school year, and the AEP multiplied by the number of students.  It should be noted that this fiscal analysis is based upon the assumption that all charter school students would have been enrolled in their district of residence if the charter school had not been in existence, and that the school districts would not have incurred costs for special education, transportation, textbooks, and health services beyond the costs that the districts would have incurred if the charter school students had been enrolled in their districts of residence.

 

It should also be noted that the total AEP per district calculated herein may be different from what the districts actually  pay to a charter school, since such payments are based upon a full-time equivalent (FTE) figure that must be derived per Commissioner’s Regulation 119.1.  Those FTEs are not reported herein since final reconciliation of payments occurs in July of each year and the data are not readily available.  The figures reported herein are a reasonable estimate, however, of the potential fiscal impact upon any district.

 

 


Table 3
 

District Expenditures for Charter Schools by Percent of Budget 2004-05

 

 

 

 

 

 

District name

Students

Adjusted

Payment to

District

% of Dist.

 

in Charter

Expense Per

Charter

Budget

Budget

 

School(s)

Pupil

Schools

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Albany

1,659

$8,894

$14,755,146

$145,340,715

10.15

Amagansett

1

$35,959

$35,959

$6,105,364

0.59

Amherst

8

$8,133

$65,064

$36,713,400

0.18

Amityville

2

$11,709

$23,418

$58,071,948

0.04

Amsterdam

3

$7,654

$22,962

$40,600,000

0.06

Baldwin

2

$11,164

$22,328

$68,373,161

0.03

Bethlehem

3

$7,693

$23,079

$59,487,294

0.04

Brentwood

2

$8,649

$17,298

$224,615,316

0.01

Buffalo

4,624

$8,245

$38,124,880

$490,900,000

7.77

Center Moriches

6

$11,460

$68,760

$26,822,000

0.26

Cheektowaga

25

$7,259

$181,475

$29,497,960

0.62

Cheektowaga-Maryvale

2

$7,352

$14,704

$29,723,578

0.05

Cheektowaga-Sloan

2

$8,406

$16,812

$22,823,997

0.07

Cleveland Hill

10

$7,103

$71,030

$22,298,497

0.32

Cohoes

4

$8,800

$35,200

$27,608,244

0.13

Depew

1

$9,260

$9,260

$31,690,175

0.03

Duanesburg

1

$6,344

$6,344

$11,146,110

0.06

East Hampton

20

$13,482

$269,640

$41,027,280

0.66

East Irondequoit

5

$7,839

$39,195

$47,282,321

0.08

East Moriches

3

$11,613

$34,839

$18,396,100

0.19

East Quogue

1

$13,606

$13,606

$15,430,583

0.09

Eastport

1

$7,885

$7,885

$60,732,449

0.01

Eden

1

$7,068

$7,068

$20,264,886

0.03

Elmont

1

$8,880

$8,880

$54,974,766

0.02

Fairport

2

$8,437

$16,874

$85,310,358

0.02

Freeport

19

$10,761

$204,459

$112,772,779

0.18

District name

Students

Adjusted

Payment to

District

% of Dist.

 

in Charter

Expense Per

Charter

Budget

Budget

 

School(s)

Pupil

Schools

 

 

Frontier

4

$6,947

$27,788

$58,367,514

0.05

Gates-Chili

5

$8,598

$42,990

$65,713,656

0.07

Grand Island

4

$8,179

$32,716

$40,612,262

0.08

Greece

7

$8,242

$57,694

$169,211,316

0.03

Guilderland

2

$8,026

$16,052

$71,241,300

0.02

Hamburg

2

$7,419

$14,838

$44,944,647

0.03

Hampton Bays

10

$9,007

$90,070

$26,701,477

0.34

Hempstead

76

$11,786

$895,736

$120,974,579

0.74

Honeoye Falls

1

$7,402

$7,402

$33,279,034

0.02

Jamesville-Dewitt

6

$8,670

$52,020

$36,304,189

0.14

Kenmore-Tonawanda

54

$8,319

$449,226

$119,218,504

0.38

Lackawanna

313

$8,395

$2,627,635

$31,815,000

8.26

Lancaster

5

$6,425

$32,125

$62,993,043

0.05

Lansingburgh

2

$7,653

$15,306

$28,102,479

0.05

Levittown

1

$12,434

$12,434

$145,082,285

0.01

Liverpool

8

$8,501

$68,008

$106,352,036

0.06

Lockport

5

$7,095

$35,475

$62,992,154

0.06

Longwood

74

$9,705

$718,170

$163,988,442

0.44

Lynbrook

1

$12,011

$12,011

$54,431,191

0.02

Lyncourt

1

$9,076

$9,076

$5,607,513

0.16

Malverne

1

$12,106

$12,106

$35,235,908

0.03

Maplewood

1

$8,254

$8,254

$2,157,945

0.38

Menands

2

$13,928

$27,856

$5,766,216

0.48

Miller Place

1

$10,111

$10,111

$45,783,264

0.02

Montauk

8

$12,872

$102,976

$11,306,861

0.91

New York City

5,391

$8,586

$46,287,126

$15,600,000,000

0.30

Newfane

2

$7,637

$15,274

$26,530,269

0.06

Niagara Falls

1

$7,815

$7,815

$106,228,137

0.01

Niagara-Wheatfield

3

$8,540

$25,620

$52,037,919

0.05

Niskayuna

5

$8,450

$42,250

$52,876,569

0.08

North Colonie

1

$8,008

$8,008

$67,034,200

0.01


 

District name

Students

Adjusted

Payment to

District

% of Dist.

 

in Charter

Expense Per

Charter

Budget

Budget

 

School(s)

Pupil

Schools

 

 

North Syracuse

9

$7,653

$68,877

$106,595,307

0.06

North Tonawanda

8

$7,800

$62,400

$53,540,423

0.12

Onondaga

1

$7,761

$7,761

$13,480,000

0.06

Orchard Park

3

$8,574

$25,722

$61,820,395

0.04

Palmyra-Macedon

1

$8,661

$8,661

$27,805,513

0.03

Patchogue-Medford

3

$8,794

$26,382

$123,263,803

0.02

Penfield

13

$9,458

$122,954

$66,737,305

0.18

Rensselaer

4

$9,030

$36,120

$14,726,080

0.25

Riverhead

83

$10,585

$878,555

$83,111,150

1.06

Rochester

2,143

$8,461

$18,131,923

$446,762,256

4.06

Rockville Centre

1

$13,166

$13,166

$71,318,553

0.02

Rocky Point

1

$8,843

$8,843

$49,216,489

0.02

Roosevelt

187

$12,289

$2,298,043

$50,797,670

4.52

Rotterdam-Mohonasen

14

$6,603

$92,442

$34,246,829

0.27

Rush-Henrietta

3

$9,281

$27,843

$86,282,936

0.03

Sag Harbor

10

$15,063

$150,630

$23,847,231

0.63

Sagaponack

1

$37,200

$37,200

$1,174,171

3.17

Schalmont

5

$13,769

$68,845

$34,917,546

0.20

Schenectady

450

$8,262

$3,717,900

$102,261,917

3.64

Schodack

1

$8,486

$8,486

$16,577,982

0.05

Scotia-Glenville

3

$8,258

$24,774

$37,348,832

0.07

Shelter Island

12

$20,831

$249,972

$7,636,261

3.27

Shenendehowa

1

$8,282

$8,282

$113,358,238

0.01

Solvay

4

$7,637

$30,548

$23,125,000

0.13

South Colonie

1

$8,934

$8,934

$69,369,288

0.01

South Country

11

$10,937

$120,307

$78,790,581

0.15

Southampton

4

$17,613

$70,452

$42,750,858

0.16


 

District Expenditures for Charter Schools by Percent of Budget 2004-05

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

District name

Students

Adjusted

Payment  to

District

% of Dist.

 

 

in Charter

Expense Per

Charter

Budget

Budget

 

 

School(s)

Pupil

Schools

 

 

 

Spencerport

1

$7,680

$7,680

$55,328,217

0.01

Springs

12

$11,314

$135,768

$14,627,263

0.93

Sweet Home

4

$8,751

$35,004

$52,709,165

0.07

Syracuse

1,080

$7,318

$7,903,440

248,238,034

3.18

Tonawanda

17

$7,189

$122,213

$19,741,989

0.62

Troy

154

$9,480

$1,459,920

$70,634,418

2.07

Uniondale

14

$12,741

$178,374

$122,974,000

0.15

Valley Stream 24

1

$14,179

$14,179

$20,606,873

0.07

Voorheesville

1

$8,722

$8,722

$18,442,445

0.05

Wainscott

1

$59,645

$59,645

$1,968,896

3.03

Wappingers

1

$7,863

$7,863

$139,928,158

0.01

Watervliet

15

$7,037

$105,555

$16,303,791

0.65

Webster

6

$8,923

$53,538

$109,131,826

0.05

West Genesee

4

$7,293

$29,172

$53,043,855

0.05

West Hill

2

$7,625

$15,250

$24,065,807

0.06

West Irondequoit

16

$7,919

$126,704

$51,041,643

0.25

West Seneca

18

$7,156

$128,808

$82,996,280

0.16

Westbury

1

$12,330

$12,330

$71,184,386

0.02

Westhampton Beach

1

$13,196

$13,196

$33,458,944

0.04

William Floyd

23

$8,639

$198,697

$154,611,917

0.13

Williamsville

4

$7,942

$31,768

$127,672,670

0.02

 

 

Academic Progress of Students Attending Charter Schools

 

          Article 56 requires that this annual report contain a comparison of the academic progress of students attending charter schools with that of students attending comparable public and non-public schools, wherever practicable.  Students attending charter schools are required to take State tests to the same extent required of other public school students.  In 2004-05, 43 charter schools served grades in which State tests were required. Tables 4 and 5 show the grade 4 State test results for each charter school as compared with the State test results for its district of location. Tables 6 and 7 show the grade 8 State test results for each charter school as compared with the State test results for its district of location. Table 8 shows the Regents Exam results for all charter schools serving students in grades 9-12.  For comparison purposes in New York City, the district of location is either the community school district in which the charter school is located or all other high schools citywide (including alternative high schools).

 

          A comparison with all non-public schools was not practicable.

 

          Note that the description for each of the performance levels on the grades 4 and 8 State tests is as follows:

 

          Level 1: These students have serious academic deficiencies.

Level 2: These students need extra help to meet the standards and pass the Regents examination.

Level 3: These students meet the standards and, with continued steady growth, should pass the Regents examination.

Level 4: These students exceed the standards and are moving toward high performance on the Regents examination.

 


Table 4

Grade 4 English Language Arts (ELA)

2004-05 School Year Results

Charter School and District of Location

Percent of Students Scoring At:

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Amber Charter School

NYC CSD #4

3.4

8.4

46.6

39.4

43.1

43.1

6.9

9.0

Ark Community Charter School

Troy City School District

16.7

7.6

44.4

38.5

38.9

44.3

0.0

9.6

Beginning with Children Charter School

NYC CSD#14

0.0

6.7

19.6

33.3

50.0

47.5

30.4

12.6

Bronx Charter School for the Arts

NYC CSD #8

7.9

10.1

34.2

40.9

44.7

41.9

13.2

7.1

Brooklyn Charter School

NYC CSD #14

3.2

6.7

29.0

33.3

58.1

47.5

9.7

12.6

Brooklyn Excelsior Charter School

NYC CSD #16

7.5

14.5

62.7

39.2

26.9

37.6

3.0

8.6

Buffalo United Charter School

Buffalo City School District

2.0

17.1

30.0

43.6

58.0

32.9

10.0

6.3

Carl C. Icahn Charter School

NYC CSD #9

0.0

10.1

13.8

42.3

75.9

39.2

10.3

8.4

Central New York Charter School for Math & Science

Syracuse City School District

9.9

11.1

49.3

38.1

35.2

41.3

5.6

9.5

Charter School for Applied Technologies

Kenmore-Tonawanda Union Free School District

Buffalo City School District*

5.8

4.9

17.1

37.9

20.6

43.6

45.6

56.7

32.9

10.7

17.7

6.3

Charter School of Science and Technology

Rochester City School District

17.4

7.9

48.7

34.8

31.3

46.9

2.6

10.4

Child Development Ctr. of the Hamptons Charter School

Wainscott Union Free School District**

0.0

-

62.5

-

37.5

-

0.0

-

COMMUNITY Charter School

Buffalo City School District

25.6

17.1

41.9

43.6

30.2

32.9

2.3

6.3

Community Partnership Charter School

NYC CSD #13

11.4

9.1

36.4

37.8

36.4

42.5

15.9

10.6

Enterprise Charter School

Buffalo City School District

13.0

17.1

50.0

43.6

32.6

32.9

4.3

6.3

Eugenio Maria de Hostos Charter School

Rochester City School District

0.0

7.9

44.7

34.8

44.7

46.9

10.5

10.4


 

Charter School and District of Location

Percent of Students Scoring At:

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Explore Charter School

NYC CSD #17

2.4

11.0

36.6

37.5

53.7

42.0

7.3

9.6

Family Life Academy Charter School

NYC CSD #9

22.5

10.1

40.0

42.3

35.0

39.2

2.5

8.4

Genesee Community Charter School

Rochester City School District

6.5

7.9

9.7

34.8

54.8

46.9

29.0

10.4

Global Concepts Charter School

Lackawanna City School District

4.7

8.6

51.2

41.7

41.9

42.4

2.3

7.3

Harbor Science and Arts Charter School

NYC CSD #4

3.6

8.4

21.4

39.4

60.7

43.1

14.3

9.0

Harlem Day Charter School

NYC CSD #4

0.0

8.4

0.0

39.4

64.7

43.1