THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK / ALBANY, NY 12234

 

TO:

The Honorable the Members of the Board of Regents

FROM:

James A. Kadamus

COMMITTEE:

EMSC-VESID

TITLE OF ITEM:

Update on Performance of Limited English Proficient/English Language Learners (LEP/ELLs) and Implementation Plan for Strategies to Improve Performance

DATE OF SUBMISSION:

February 24, 2005

PROPOSED HANDLING:

Discussion

RATIONALE FOR ITEM:

Monitoring of Regents Policy

STRATEGIC GOAL:

Goals 1 and 2

AUTHORIZATION(S):

 

 

SUMMARY:

 

Attachment A provides an analysis of performance of limited English proficient/English language learners on the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT).  This is the first time the Department has had a consistent measurement tool available to assess the performance of LEP/ELLs.  It has enabled the Department to make some generalizations about schools that provide instruction to these students; however, further research is needed.  As the individual student record system is implemented, it will put us in a better position to make conclusions about what makes programs for LEP/ELLs most effective.  In addition, the Department has hired a new vendor to produce the NYSESLAT.  This new vendor will review NYSESLAT standards in relation to proficiency levels on the grades 3-8 tests and Regents English exam to ensure consistency.

 

At your October 2004 meeting, 10 strategies were identified to improve the performance of LEP/ELLs.  Department staff was asked to develop an implementation plan and to report periodically on the progress in implementing the 10 strategies.  Attachment B identifies the implementation steps for each of the strategies, a timeline for implementation, and when reports to the Board have been scheduled.  As more is known on the performance of LEP/ELLs, these strategies will be reviewed to ensure that they will result in improvement in programs for LEP/ELLs.

 

 

Attachments


 

                                                                                Attachment A

 

Performance of Limited English Proficient/English Language Learners (LEP/ELLs)

 

 

New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test

 

The English language proficiency of limited English proficient/English language learners (LEP/ELLs) is measured by the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT), which includes assessments of reading, writing, listening, and speaking.  Five forms (levels) of the test are provided for the following grade spans:  kindergarten and one, two through four, five and six, seven and eight, and nine through twelve. The NYSESLAT was first administered in April and May of 2003.

 

The four subtests are paired to obtain measures of students’ skills in the domains of listening/speaking and reading/writing.  Student scores in each of these domains are assigned to one of four performance levels:  beginning, intermediate, advanced and proficient.  Students scoring at the highest level in both domains are considered to be proficient in English and may exit from programs or services designed for LEP/ELLs. Students may also be deemed English proficient if they

·                  reach proficiency on the elementary- or middle-level English language arts assessment or score 55 or higher on the Regents English examination and achieve a criterion score on the listening/speaking domain of the NYSESLAT, or

·                  achieve a criterion total score based on the sum of scores achieved on each of the four NYSESLAT subtests.

 

The Department has set a State standard for satisfactory progress in acquiring English:  LEP/ELLs are expected to improve their performance by at least one level each year.  For example, students who scored at the beginning level in May 2003 were expected to score at the intermediate level in May 2004.  Students who reach proficiency are counted as making satisfactory progress.

 

Statewide Results

 

This section presents an analysis of the percentage of LEP/ELLs by grade span who made the expected gain on the NYSESLAT (met the State progress standard) and the percentage that reached proficiency in English in May 2004. Statewide, over 179,000 LEP/ELLs, from 2,200 schools, took the NYSESLAT in 2004.  Over 71 percent of these LEP/ELLs were enrolled in New York City.

 

In New York City, across all grades, about 70 percent of LEP/ELLs met the State Progress Standard and almost 22 percent reached proficiency in English. In the rest of the State, across all grades, about 76 percent of LEP/ELLs met the State annual Progress Standard and about 21 percent reached proficiency.

 

 

Table 1

Performance on the 2004 NYSESLAT

 

Grade Span

Total Number of LEP/ELLs Pupils

Percent meeting Progress Standard

Percent Reaching Proficiency

New York City

K-1

36,083

85.6%

12.5%

2-4

29,912

72.5%

33.5%

5-6

17,526

59.6%

7.6%

7-8

17,973

69.0%

46.9%

9-12

26,644

52.8%

13.4%

 

128,138

69.9%

21.8%

Rest of State

K-1

15,981

85.6%

15.4%

2-4

15,270

77.4%

29.3%

5-6

6,526

72.1%

13.2%

7-8

5,405

78.3%

24.7%

9-12

8,141

55.2%

18.4%

Total

51,323

75.8%

20.7%

Total State

K-1

52,064

85.6%

13.4%

2-4

45,182

74.2%

32.1%

5-6

24,052

63.0%

9.1%

7-8

23,378

71.2%

41.8%

9-12

34,785

53.4%

14.6%

Total

179,461

71.6%

21.5%

 

Table 1 shows that the largest numbers of LEP/ELLs were enrolled in grades kindergarten through grade 4.  Since students generally need three years of English instruction to reach proficiency, the majority of students that are LEP/ELL when they enter kindergarten will not reach proficiency before grade 2.

 

Table 1 shows that the patterns of performance were similar between New York City and the rest of the State. There was, however, considerable variation among grade spans in the percentage of students reaching proficiency.  Students in grades 7 and 8 were most likely to reach proficiency, while students in grades 5 and 6 were least likely to do so.

 

This variation can be explained by the alternate method for students in grades 4 and 8 and high school to demonstrate English proficiency using the English language arts assessments or the Regents English test and achieving the criterion score on the listening/speaking domain of the NYSESLAT.  Table 2 shows the number of students in grades 4 and 8 and at the high school level that demonstrated proficiency in 2003-04 by the method used. Over 90 percent of exiting LEP/ELLs in grades 4 and 8 had scored at the proficient level on the ELA assessments.

 

Sixty-one percent of high school students who achieved English proficiency in 2003-04 scored at least 55 on the Regents English examination and achieved the criterion score on the listening/speaking domain of the NYSESLAT.  Only a portion of LEP/ELLs at the high school level would have completed the required coursework to challenge the Regents English examination.  Of the 3,102 high school students who scored 55 or higher on the Regents English examination, 890 did not reach either of the exit criteria based solely on the NYSESLAT.

 

Table 2

Students Who Demonstrated Proficiency in 2003-04 by the Method Used

 

Method Used to Demonstrate Proficiency

Grade 4

Grade 8

High School

Scored at Levels 3 or 4 on ELA Assessment or Scored 55-100 on Regents English Examination and Achieved a Criterion Score on the Listening/Speaking Domain of the NYSESLAT

94.2%

97.9%

61.1%

Achieved Criterion Total Score on NYSESLAT

20.9%

13.7%

50.6%

Achieved Proficiency in Reading/Writing and Listening/Speaking on NYSESLAT

18.9%

15.0%

47.5%

Total Number Demonstrating Proficiency in English

9,155

8,564

5,076

Note:  The percentages exceed 100 because students may have demonstrated English proficiency in multiple ways.

 

These data raise some issues regarding the English proficiency standard on the NYSESLAT.  Before establishing standards for the 2004-05 and future administrations of the NYSESLAT, the new vendor will review the standard setting process as well as the relationship between demonstrating proficiency in English language arts on the State assessments at all levels as compared to demonstrating proficiency in English on the NYSESLAT.

 

Contrasts in School Performance

 

This section presents data from approximately 1,320 schools that had at least 20 enrolled LEP/ELLs in grades K-8 in May 2004.  These schools had a total enrollment of 973,673 students, of which about 14 percent were LEP/ELLs.  In the median school in this group, 81 percent of LEP/ELLs met the State performance standard; that is, half of the schools had 81 percent or more of their LEP/ELLs meeting the State Progress Standard and half had fewer than 81 percent doing so.  In all schools, at least 50 percent of LEP/ELLs met the State Progress Standard.  In the median school, 7.7 percent of LEP/ELLs reached English language proficiency.

 

To further evaluate school performance, a composite score based on 15 NYSESLAT performance criteria was created.  The composite score included improvement on all subtests between 2003 and 2004 NYSESLAT administrations, as well as multiple indices of LEP/ELLs performance in 2004. The 1,320 schools were ranked from lowest to highest on this composite scale and were grouped into four quartiles, each comprising about 25 percent of the number of schools.  New York City and rest of State schools in the lowest quartile were compared with New York City and rest of State schools in the highest quartile.  Table 3 shows the contrasts between quartiles.

 

Table 3

Contrasts Between the Lowest and Highest Quartiles of Schools Ranked by a Composite Measure of NYSESLAT Performance

(Comparisons Are Based on LEP/ELL Students in Grades K-8)

 

 

Lowest Quartile

Highest Quartile

New York City

Rest of State

New York City

Rest of State

Percent of Schools Ranked by Quartiles

31.3%

15.8%

22.4%

43.8%

Average Number of K-8 LEP/ELLs in School

121

78

96

54

Average Percentage of LEP/ELLs in School

17.0%

13.6%

11.4%

8.8%

Average Percentage of K-8 LEP/ELLs in Poverty

81.0%

74.4%

54.2%

51.8%

Average Percentage of K-8 LEP/ELLs Classified as Disabled

15.9%

10.6%

8.0%

4.8%

Average Number of Years in LEP/ELL Programs or Services

2.2

1.7

1.8

1.8

 

The distribution of schools between the lowest and highest quartiles was not proportionate between New York City and the rest of State.  Compared with the rest of State, New York City had twice as many schools in the lowest quartile and half as many in the highest quartile.

 

Table 3 shows that school performance on the NYSESLAT decreased as the percentage of economically disadvantaged students and the percentage of disabled students increased.  Consistently, New York City schools had more LEP/ELLs, and larger percentages of LEP/ELLs, disabled LEP/ELLs, and economically disadvantaged LEP/ELLs than rest of State schools.  Comparing New York City and rest of State schools in the lowest and highest quartiles showed consistent differences between quartiles on the following criteria:

 

·                 schools in the lowest quartile, in New York City and in the rest of State, enrolled a larger number of LEP/ELLs than schools in the highest quartile;

·                 schools in the lowest quartile enrolled a larger percentage of LEP/ELLs students than schools in the highest quartile;

·                 the percentage of LEP/ELLs who were economically disadvantaged was substantially higher in the lowest than the highest quartile schools; and

·                 LEP/ELLs attending schools in the lowest quartile were more likely to be disabled than those attending schools in the highest quartile.

 

The average number of years that LEP/ELLs had been served in LEP/ELL programs was about the same for all groups (about 1.8 years), except that New York City schools in the lowest quartile had a slightly higher average (about 2.2 years).  Overall, the average indicated that most LEP/ELLs have been served for less than two years.

 

It appears that in schools where LEP/ELLs are a larger percentage of enrollment, they do not achieve proficiency as quickly as in schools with smaller percentage of LEP/ELL enrollment.  Perhaps in schools with greater counts of LEP/ELLs, there are more students per certified bilingual or English as a second language teacher and the students have less opportunity to interact with proficient English speakers.

 

Table 4

Contrasts Between the Lowest and Highest Quartiles of Schools Ranked by a Composite Measure of NYSESLAT Performance

(Comparisons Are Based on Students in Grades 4, 5, and 8)

 

 

Lowest Quartile

Highest Quartile

Average Percentage of LEP/ELLs in Poverty

74.3%

55.4%

Average Percentage of Non-LEP/ELLs in Poverty

68.3%

37.4%

Average Percentage of LEP/ELLs Classified as Disabled

27.1%

14.4%

Average Percentage of Non-LEP/ELLs Classified as Disabled

16.7%

11.8%

Percentage of Schools Identified as Needing Improvement under the Accountability System

37.3%

12.5%

 

Comparable data on disability and poverty rates for LEP/ELL students and English proficient students are available for grades 4, 5, and 8. Table 4 shows that LEP/ELL students in these grades in both the lowest- and highest-quartiles had higher rates of poverty and disability than English proficient students.

 

Schools in the lowest and highest quartiles differed in other ways: Table 4 shows that English proficient students in schools in the lowest quartile were more likely to be disabled and more likely to be economically disadvantaged than such students in schools in the highest quartile.  Further, schools in the lowest quartile were more likely to be in improvement status than schools in the highest quartile, indicating that educational programs in some of these schools are less effective than in schools in the highest quartile. The key to truly understanding the differences between the low- and high-performing schools lies in observation and analysis of their educational programs for limited English proficient and English proficient students.

 

Years in Program

 

Substantial variations were found in the rates of disability and economic disadvantage according to the number of years that students had been in English as a second language (ESL) or bilingual programs.  Of LEP/ELLs in grades 3-8, 84 percent had received English instruction for three or fewer years.  The remainder had received services for four to six years.

 

Students who remain LEP/ELL for a longer period of time are more likely to have been classified as disabled.  On average, students with disabilities can be expected to have more difficulty demonstrating English language proficiency.  However, LEP/ELLs who are slower to acquire English proficiency may be more likely to be classified. While the sequence of identification as LEP/ELL versus a student with a disability cannot be determined with current data, the individual student record system should eventually provide us with information in this area.  On average, almost 11 percent of LEP/ELLs were classified as disabled, but the percentage classified increased from only 5 percent of students in year 1 of instruction to 34 percent in year 7.  Schools in the lowest quartile had larger percentages of LEP/ELLs with disabilities than schools in the highest quartile (Table 3).  This difference between quartiles cannot be attributed to LEP/ELLs in the lowest quartile having a greater number of years in program, because the quartiles did not differ substantially in years in program. 

 

LEP/ELLs were more likely than other students to have come from economically disadvantaged families.  On average, 65 percent of LEP/ELLs were economically disadvantaged.  The more years that a student had been identified as LEP/ELL, the more likely it was that the student came from an economically disadvantaged family.  The percentage increased from 58 percent for newly identified students to 78 percent for students with more than five years of English instruction.

 

Performance of LEP/ELLs Who First Entered Grade 9 in 2000

 

This study included students who first enrolled in grade 9 during the 2000-01 school year (or were ungraded and reached their seventeenth birthday during that school year) and who were enrolled in a public school in New York State in at least part of the 2001-02, 2002-03, or 2003-04 school years and for whom a district submitted a STEP record in August 2004.

The population studied was 199,312 students who were reported to the Department as first entering grade 9 in the 2000-01 school year, and who had graduated, dropped out, entered a GED program, or were still enrolled in a district on June 30, 2004.  This population included 10,940 LEP/ELLs.

 

Statewide, almost 35 percent of LEP/ELLs in this group had graduated, but almost four in ten were still enrolled.  LEP/ELLs also had a higher dropout rate than general-education students or students with disabilities, 23.9 percent statewide (Table 5). 

 

Table 5

The Percentages of Limited English Proficient/English Language Learners in the Group by Outcome as of June 30, 2004

Outcome as of June 30, 2004

Total Public

Number

Percent

Regents/Local Diploma

3,773

34.5%

Earned IEP Diploma

110

1.0

Still Enrolled

4,279

39.1

Transferred to GED

160

1.5

Dropped Out

2,610

23.9

Other Exit

8

0.1

Total

10,940

100.0

 

About 80 percent of LEP/ELLs are in New York City, and the data presented here are consistent with, but somewhat better than, the data historically reported by the New York City Department of Education.  By contrast, former LEP/ELLs in New York City (almost 18,000 of their annual cohort) typically graduate at a higher rate even than students who have never been LEP/ELL.  Table 6 shows statistics for students who first entered grade 9 in 1996 (and were scheduled to graduate in 2000) based on a report published by the New York City Department of Education, The Class of 2000: Final Longitudinal Report—A Three-Year Follow-Up Study: The credentials earned included high school diplomas, IEP diplomas, and high school equivalency diplomas.


 

Table 6

Graduation Rates for New York City Students Who First Entered Grade 9 in 1996

 

Student Group

Number of Students

After Four Years of High School

After Seven Years of High School

Current LEP/ELLs

8,791

32.6%

49.5%

Former LEP/ELLs

10,996

60.1%

76.5%

Never LEP/ELLs

42,157

54.5%

70.5%

 

The performance of these LEP/ELLs on Regents examinations was also studied (Table 7).  A significant portion of LEP/ELLs had not taken Regents examinations in each of the required areas by June 30, 2004.  Table 5 shows that many of the LEP/ELLs were still enrolled and can be expected to take additional examinations in the 2004-05 school year.  Statewide, the percentage of LEP/ELLs who met the assessment requirement for graduation by scoring 65 or higher on a Regents examination ranged from 32.3 percent in English to 43.3 percent in global history.  LEP/ELLs were less successful on the English exam than on the remaining required examinations for which translated versions are available.  LEP/ELLs, like students with disabilities, were more likely than other students to use the 55-64 low-pass option to meet graduation requirements.  The percentage who met the competency requirement for a local diploma by scoring 55 to 64 on a Regents examination ranged from 7.1 percent in U.S. history to 13.5 percent in science.

 

 

Table 7

Regents Examination Performance of Limited English Proficient/English Language Learners Who Entered Grade 9 in 2000-01

Examination

Not Tested

Percent of Students Scoring

0-54

55-64

65-100

New York City

 

English

41.3%

16.2%

13.0%

29.5%

Mathematics

39.5

12.2

12.1

36.2

Global History

35.0

13.3

9.4

42.3

U.S. History

46.5

7.4

6.9

39.1

Science

37.8

13.3

14.0

34.9

Rest of State

 

English

34.4

11.4

11.0

43.2

Mathematics

31.9

13.3

11.3

43.6

Global History

35.1

9.4

7.9

47.6

U.S. History

35.7

5.9

7.6

50.8

Science

28.2

7.3

11.7

52.8

Total Public

 

 

 

 

English

39.9

15.2

12.6

32.3

Mathematics

37.9

12.4

12.0

37.7

Global History

35.0

12.5

9.1

43.3

U.S. History

44.3

7.1

7.1

41.5

Science

35.8

12.1

13.5

38.6

 

 

 

 

 


 

                                                                                                    Attachment B

 

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN FOR STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE THE PERFORMANCE OF

LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENT/ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (LEP/ELLs)

 

Recommendations

Implementation Steps

Implementation Timeline

Report to Regents

Strategy 1

Improve the quality of teachers of English as a second language (ESL) and bilingual education programs by:

·       developing and supporting alternative certificate programs to prepare certified bilingual and ESL teachers, such as

  • Transition B;
  • Conditional Initial Certificate;
  • The Internship Certificate;
  • Supplementary Certificate;
  • Modified Temporary Certificate; (see attachment A for definitions) and

·       expanding professional development for teachers and building administrators on the best practices and strategies for instructing LEP/ELLs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Offices of the Professions, EMSC and VESID are collaborating on a series of strategies designed to increase the number of certified bilingual and ESL teachers.

 

A statewide meeting of representatives of institutions of higher education and districts with large numbers of LEP/ELLs will be held to discuss the issues and provide input in the development of a joint plan.

 

Different teacher education models being supported through Intensive Teacher Institute (ITI) funds are being evaluated as possible models for continued support and/or expansion.  For example, the ITI-funded Transition B program model for a cohort of ESL teachers at Columbia University Teachers College will be reviewed for possible replication.

 

The 2004-05 Intensive Teacher Institute will support 440 bilingual/English language arts (ELA) general education and special education teachers in their completion of bilingual and ESL certification.

 

 

Include teachers of LEP/ELLs as a category in the monitoring of Title II-A professional development funding and in professional development plans.

 

Include the professional development needs of teachers of LEP/ELLs in the on-line professional development proposed for the New York State Virtual Learning System.

 

Survey the Teachers Centers for successful professional development strategies.

 

Conduct three regional bilingual/ESL Teacher Institutes for teachers and administrators of programs for LEP/ELLs (March 3, Rye; March 18, Long Island; and

April 13, Albany).

 

Work with Bilingual Education Technical Assistance Centers (BETACs) in conducting professional development activities in their respective regions for teachers and administrators of programs for LEP/ELLs.

 

SED's Office of Bilingual Education, five New York City BETACs, and the New York City Department of Education's Division of English Language Learners will collaborate on the provision of professional development to the teachers and administrators of LEP/ELLs in New York City.  Special priority will be give to high school teachers.

 

Bilingual and ESL teacher trainers/leaders will be developed through a three-year Bilingual Education Teacher Leadership Academy (BETLA).  BETLA will work with a cohort of outstanding bilingual and ESL teachers each year in developing leadership skills and the knowledge base needed to enable them to provide effective professional development in their schools and districts.  Among the collaborators on this project are Bank Street College (The Principal Leadership Academy), the New York City Department of Education's Division of English Language Learners, community school districts, principals of participating schools, and SED's Office of Bilingual Education. 

 

January-June 2006

 

 

 

 

March-April 2005

 

 

 

 

 

January-June 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 2004-June 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

January-May 2005

 

 

 

 

January–February 2005

 

 

March-April 2005

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing through 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 2005

 

 

 

 

 

October 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 2005

 

June 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 2006

Strategy 2

Improve the quality of ESL and bilingual education curriculum and instruction by:

·       disseminating New York State curriculum guides for English as a second language and native language arts; and

·       providing more information on classroom lessons that can be the basis for additional professional development for teachers.

 

SED will disseminate the following publications to school districts statewide:

·       The Teaching of Language Arts to Limited English Proficient/English Language Learners: Learning Standards for English as a Second Language; and

·       The Teaching of Language Arts to Limited English Proficient/English Language Learners: Learning Standards for Native Language Arts.

Over 18,000 copies of these publications have been printed and distributed to districts.

 

Develop trainer facilitator guides and training tool kits for each of the above publications, including all of the materials needed to conduct three-day professional development institutes for trainers of trainers, teachers and administrators of LEP/ELLs. 

 

BETACs will conduct professional development institutes for trainers in their respective service areas on the publications using the training facilitator guide and tool kits.  All trainees will receive all of the documents and material needed for turnkey training. The New York City BETACs will work in collaboration with the New York City Department of Education's Division of English Language Learners.

 

Workshops will be provided by the BETACS across the State on the implementation of the ESL and Native Language Arts (NLA) standards.  These will include effective classroom strategies and lesson plans for the teaching of ESL and NLA. 

 

The ESL/NLA Successful Learning Activities Electronic Catalogue Series will be developed and posted on SED's web site.   Successful learning activities and lesson plans for the teaching of native language art in the various languages and the teaching of ESL following New York’s ESL/NLA learning standards will be collected and posted on the web site. Bilingual and ESL teachers will be encouraged to contribute their successful learning activities and lesson plans for possible inclusion in the collection. 

 

In collaboration with the New York City Department of Education's Division of English Language Learners, the New York City BETACS, and SED's Office of Bilingual Education, bilingual and ESL teachers in New York City will receive training on the ESL and NLA publications.

 

July 2004-June 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

June 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 2005

 

Strategy 3

Increase monitoring by SED and the New York City Department of Education to ensure that language allocation requirements are in place, i.e., the proportion of time spent on English and native language instruction at different grade levels. 

 

SED's Office of Bilingual Education will issue a Request for Proposals to contract an outside vendor to conduct a quality review of the implementation of programs as required under CR Part 154 and NCLB Title III Part A in districts with the largest numbers of LEP/ELLs.

 

SED's Office of Bilingual Education will collaborate with and support New York City Department of Education's Quality Review Program, designed to monitor and provide technical assistance to schools in implementing the State's Part 154 LEP program and the Title III program under NCLB.

 

All SED monitoring will review implementa-tion of the language allocation requirements in bilingual and freestanding ESL programs.

 

January 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2005-June 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2005-June 2006

 

November 2005

Strategy 4

Organize and disseminate data from the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test (NYSESLAT).  Take steps to make sure the data are used by teachers and administrators to inform classroom practice and to identify high- and low-performing programs.

 

NYSESLAT performance data is collected annually from school districts via LEAP and STEP.  The statewide data will be released once the LEAP and STEP are certified and approved by the Commissioner.  Attachment A provides a 2004 summary report on "The Performance of Limited English Proficient Students on the New York State English as a Second Language Achievement Test."

 

SED has awarded Harcourt Assessment, Inc. a five- year contract to continue the development of the NYSESLAT and to prepare the performance data starting with the 2005 administration.  SED's Offices of State Assessment and Bilingual Education, BETACs, and schools districts will be trained on the administration of the new NYSESLAT test (February 4, Long Island; February 7,  Albany; February 15, Rochester; and March 1-3, New York City).

 

Districts will be informed about their performance on the 2005 NYSESLAT. A report will be issued on the performance of all Title III schools by districts.  Those districts that have schools that have not met the measurable achievement objectives in English language acquisition as measured by the NYSESLAT will be notified and be required to prepare a plan on how they will help their schools improve their performance. 

 

SED staff from the Offices of Bilingual Education and Information and Reporting Services, the Regional Information Centers, and the BETACS will provide technical assistance to districts on interpreting the data and on strategies to improve student performance.

 

Districts that demonstrate outstanding performance will be recognized and receive a Regents/Department certificate of commendation.  Descriptions of elements contributing to their success will be posted on the SED's web site.

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

Prior to public release of the data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 2005

 

Strategy 5

Review high school equivalency programs that serve LEP/ELLs to determine if these programs should be subject to the same intensive English requirements that exist for regular high school level programs for LEP/ELLs. 

Modify the Alternative High School Equivalency Education Program/High School Equivalency application to capture information on programs with large numbers of LEP/ELLs.

 

Identify 10 programs with the largest number of LEP/ELLs.

 

Conduct on-site visits involving staff of the BETACs, Regional School Support Centers, and SED Offices of Adult Education and Workforce Development, Bilingual Education, Regional School Services and New York City School Improvement and Community Services.

 

December 2004

 

 

 

 

 

June 2005

 

 

July 2005- January 2006

February 2006

Strategy 6

Advocate for additional funding from the federal government and State Legislature to expand dual language programs and create a program of educational support services for students who transition from LEP/ELL status into the regular education program.

 

Institute a process for reviewing all entitlement funding programs under No Child Left Behind that can be used to support the needs of LEP/ELLs in all large city and high need school districts.

 

In 2004-05, SED will review the use of Title III funds as part of a consolidated application from these districts. 

 

Request an additional $37 million in the State LEP Aid proposal to increase the number of Two-Way Bilingual Education programs.

 

Advocate for increased general purpose operating aid for school districts with concentrations of pupils living in poverty.  This increased aid can be used to recruit and retain qualified teachers. 

 

Allocate $2 million of the State 2004-2005 Bilingual Education Categorical Funds to fund 13 Two-Way Bilingual Education programs  (8 in New York City and 5 in the rest of the State).

 

Ensure districts are aware they may use federal funds under NCLB Title III Part A to establish Two-Way Bilingual Education programs.

 

Collaborate with the New York City Department of Education in the development of strategies, including a summer program for high school LEP/ELLs.

 

Review all applications for NCLB Title III to ensure that the needs of high school LEP/ELLs are being addressed.

 

Review, approve and process 271 applications for districts eligible for Title III funds.  (178 LEAs and 93 Consortium applications) 

 

2005-2006 Budget Request

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

2004-2005

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

November 2005

Strategy 7

Support the New York City Department of Education and other school districts serving high concentrations of LEP/ELLs in training principals and other administrators to improve their awareness of the needs of LEP/ELLs and to inform them of the most effective instructional strategies. 

 

In collaboration with the New York City Council of Supervisors and Administrators and the New York City Department of Education's Division of English Language Learners, identify a cohort of 20 principals each year to provide intensive professional development on the education of LEP/ELLs

 

In collaboration with the Big 4 districts and selected districts with large numbers of LEP/ELLs and the BETACs outside of New York City, identify a cohort of 20 principals to provide intensive professional development on the education of LEP/ELLs. 

 

January 2005–June 2006

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 2005-June 2006

 

November 2005

Strategy 8

Work with the New York City Department of Education and other school districts serving high concentrations of LEP/ELLs to establish better information for parents on English as a second language and bilingual programs and on programs that can improve their own levels of reading, writing and speaking English.

 

Develop and disseminate electronically and by mail the parent information brochure, A Guide for Parents of LEP students on NCLB Title III Part A. The brochure has been translated into Spanish, Chinese Traditional and Simplified, Korean, Arabic, Bengali, and Urdu.  The BETACs use the brochure for parents in workshops.  The New York City BETACs have used it to provide training to the New York City Parent Liaisons in the New York City Schools in collaboration with the New York City Department of Education's Division of English Language Learners. 

 

Develop and disseminate a parent information booklet, A Guide for Parents of LEP Students:  Educational Programs and Services  –CR Part 154 and NCLB Title III. Translate it into the top languages, disseminate it to schools, and use it for conferences, workshops, and institutes for parents. 

 

Just the Facts for Parents and NCLB Information for Parents developed by SED is available on SED's web site.  These have been developed and disseminated in Spanish, Haitian Creole, Urdu, Chinese, Arabic and Russian.

 

In collaboration with the New York City Department of Education's Division of English Language Learners, the New York City BETACs will train the New York City Parent Liaisons on the needs, laws, rules, regulations and programs and services for LEP/ELLs.

 

SED will assist the New York City Department of Education's Division of English Language Learners in the review, revision, updating and upgrading of all of the parent information requirements relative to CR Part 154 and Title III.  Financial support will be provided through a Bilingual Education Categorical grant.  The need to provide information in the languages spoken by the parents of LEP/ELLs will be addressed. 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On-going

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing

 

 

 

February 2006

Strategy 9

Work with the New York City Department of Education to identify new funding for immigrant students that can be allocated to improve instruction and support services for English-speaking Caribbean students.

 

Adjust the formula to increase the number of districts eligible to receive funds under the Title III Immigrant Program and require that they address the needs of immigrant students from countries where English is the official language.

 

Revise and publish the SED publication on the education of students from the English-speaking Caribbean countries.  Disseminate to schools with significant numbers of students from the countries in the publication.  

 

Provide a summer institute for teachers and administrators of students from English-speaking Caribbean countries.

 

July 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 2005

 

February 2006

Strategy 10

Create a Committee of Practitioners to advise the Commissioner and the Regents on implementation of State policy on LEP/ELLs.

A Committee of Practitioners composed of approximately 25 persons representing linguistic, geographic and grade level diversity will be named.  They will meet three times a year to advise the Department on issues relative to the education of LEP/ELLs. 

 

Spring 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 2006