THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT / THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK / ALBANY, NY 12234

 

TO:

EMSC-VESID Committee

FROM:

James A. Kadamus

SUBJECT:

New York State High School Initiative

DATE:

December 7, 2005

STRATEGIC GOAL:

Goals 1 and 2

AUTHORIZATION(S):

 

 

SUMMARY

 

Issue for Discussion

 

What additional performance indicators should be monitored to track the progress of high schools/districts in our New York State High School Initiative?

 

Reason(s) for Consideration

 

Implemention of policy.
         

Proposed Handling

 

This issue will come before the Regents EMSC-VESID Committee on December 8, 2005.

 

Procedural History

 

The New York High School Initiative includes several strategies focused on identifying students in academic difficulty and ensuring they get adequate help.  The high school completion strategy is focused on the urgency of improving high school performance and brings together schools that have the lowest graduation rates and the highest proportions of students taking three or fewer Regents exams in four years.  Through a series of “Destination Diploma” forums, SED’s goal is to create a community of professional practice among school district teams, along with State and regional technical assistance providers and professional organizations that have been struggling with these issues.  In May, the Regents received a report on the first Destination Diploma forums held in March in Albany and in May in New York City.  On May 25, a PBS broadcast of High School Completion Strategies That Work examined three of the high schools involved in the May Destination Diploma meeting.  In September, the Regents received an update on the high school completion strategy, information on what other states and national organizations are doing and saying about high schools, and a proposal for five key strategies to serve as the foundation of the New York High School Initiative.  A third Destination Diploma forum is scheduled on December 12-13, 2005 in Albany and we will report to the Board on the results in January.

 

Background Information

 

In December 2004, the Committee received an analysis of the Regents exam performance and educational outcomes of students who first entered grade 9 in the 2000-01 school year.  It showed a disturbing picture of many students who entered high school unprepared to do high school-level work, do not pass their courses and earn fewer than the 22 local high school credits they need for graduation in four years.  Further, the data showed that these students were concentrated originally in 135 high schools in 12 school districts and represented about 22 percent of the State’s high school enrollment.  Several of those high schools were closed during this year so we now have 127 schools from 12 school districts that we are tracking.  We will monitor the progress of these schools using a number of performance indicators. 

 

The attached report provides updated summary data for the 2000 cohort based on STEP files submitted in August 2005.  Summary data are provided for all public high schools, New York City high schools and rest of State high schools.  In addition, aggregate and school level data are presented for the 127 identified high schools on selected performance indicators.  In January, we will provide the Committee with statewide performance results for the 2001 student cohort and a status report on activities undertaken during 2005 and planned for 2006 to target assistance to these high schools.

 

We continue to establish ongoing capacity building with teams from those schools and districts and will create a greater sense of urgency to improve student performance.  That work has concentrated on a short list of practices with a high probability of success.  As we learned at the Summit on New York Education, additional work is needed to build urgency on high schools in areas such as the following:

 

1.               Set targets for high school graduation and measure results.

2.               Make local school boards accountable for high school performance.

3.               Check teacher qualifications and order changes where necessary to ensure qualified staff.

4.               Strengthen teaching through professional developed focused on proven curricula and lesson plans.

5.               Update school safety plans.

6.               Engage the public and students.

7.               Improvement achievement among the highest performing students.

 

Details of these initiatives are included in the Commissioner’s Monthly Report to the Regents.

 

 

 

 

 

Recommendation

 

We recommend that the Regents review the data provided on the 127 high schools and 12 districts and identify whether there are additional performance indicators on which staff should monitor progress.

 

Timetable for Implementation

 

Staff will continue to provide the Committee with reports on the progress of the 127 high schools in improving student performance.

 

 

 

Attachment


New York State High School Initiative

 

 

Analysis of Graduation Rates for the 2000 Cohort Based on the 2005 STEP File

 

In January 2005, we presented the Board of Regents with a plan of action for helping high school students in academic difficulty. The proposed approach was intended to help students in academic difficulty, to help educators in schools with low graduation rates who work with these students, and to provide reasonable opportunities for a small number of students who may be close to passing the Regents exams and who pass their courses but may not do as well on a particular test.

Based on cohort data first available in 2004, in January 2005, we identified 135 high schools in 12 school districts that had graduation rates under 70 percent and were already identified as needing improvement or as a School under Registration Review (SURR) under the State accountability system (see Appendix A for a list of schools). The 12 school districts were:  New York City, Buffalo, Rochester, Syracuse, Yonkers, Mount Vernon, Amsterdam, Roosevelt, Hempstead, Wyandanch, Freeport and Central Islip. 

These schools were identified based on an analysis of the graduation rates of students who first enrolled in grade 9 during the 2000-01 school year (or were ungraded and reached their seventeenth birthday during that school year) and who were enrolled in a public school in New York State in at least part of the 2001-02, 2002-03, or 2003-04 school years and for whom a district submitted a STEP record in August 2004. This paper presents updated graduation rates for public schools, statewide, in New York City, and in rest of State schools, and in the high schools identified in January 2005.  The updated figures are based on analyses of student records in the STEP files submitted to the Department in August 2005, which reported on student outcomes through June 30, 2005.

The 2005 STEP file included records for 243,869 students (both general-education students and students with disabilities) reported to have first entered grade 9 in 2000-01.  Of those records, 210,159 reported students who had graduated, earned an IEP diploma, dropped out, entered a GED program, or were still enrolled. The records of these students were used in these analyses. Another 8,052 records reported that a student had left New York State public schools to transfer out of State, to a nonpublic school, or to home instruction, or that the student had died. Because these students were no longer in the pool of possible graduates, these records were removed from the study. The remaining 25,658 records reported that the student had transferred to another district at some time between first entering grade 9 in the 2000-01 school year and June 30, 2005. These students were assumed to have duplicate records reported by the district to which the student transferred and were not included in the study. 

The 2005 STEP file included more records for students in this cohort than the 2004 STEP file (which included 199,312 records used in the 2004 analyses).  This difference can be attributed to greater understanding of, and compliance with, reporting requirements. In addition, the fact that the 2000 cohort was used for graduation rate accountability in the 2004-05 school year may have motivated schools to be particularly careful in reporting data for students in this cohort.

Tables 1-3 show the percentages of 2000 cohort members as of June 30, 2005 in each outcome category. Statewide, five years after first entering grade 9, more than 71 percent of this cohort had graduated and another 2 percent had earned IEP diplomas. Almost six percent had entered a general education development (GED) program; we do not have data showing the number of these students who may have earned high school equivalency diplomas. Finally, over 15 percent of these students left school without earning a diploma.

Not surprisingly, New York City, which serves a large percentage of at-risk students, had a lower graduation rate than rest of State schools. The calculations used in the present study are different than those used by the New York City Department of Education in their longitudinal cohort studies. New York City names their cohorts according to the expected date of graduation; therefore, the State’s 2000 Cohort would be New York City’s Class of 2004. The Class of 2004 is different from the State’s 2000 cohort in that it does not include students with disabilities educated in self-contained classrooms (5,842 students were excluded for this reason). The published graduation rate for New York City’s Class of 2004 after four years is 54.3 percent. In New York City’s calculation, students who earned high school equivalency diplomas are counted as graduates. The inclusion of all students with disabilities in the cohort and the exclusion of high school equivalency diploma recipients from the count of graduates result in the State reporting a lower graduation rate than New York City reports.

Table 1

The Percentage of Students in the 2000 Group by

Outcomes as of June 30, 2005 after Five Years for All Public High Schools

Outcomes as of June 30, 2005

Total Public

Number

Percent

Regents/Local Diploma

149,757

71.3

IEP Diploma

4,369

2.1

Enrolled

11,893

5.7

Transferred to GED

11,946

5.7

Dropped Out

32,194

15.3

Total

210,159

100.0

 

Table 2

The Percentage of Students in the 2000 Group by

Outcomes as of June 30, 2005 after Five Years for All New York City High Schools

Outcomes as of June 30, 2005

Total Public

Number

Percent

Regents/Local Diploma

39,027

52.7

IEP Diploma

1,520

2.1

Enrolled

9,071

12.2

Transferred to GED

5,489

7.4

Dropped Out

18,997

25.6

Total

74,104

100.0

 


Table 3

The Percentage of Students in the 2000 Group by

Outcomes as of June 30, 2005 after Five Years for All Rest of State High Schools

Outcomes as of June 30, 2005

Total Public

Number

Percent

Regents/Local Diploma

110,730

81.4

IEP Diploma

2,849

2.1

Enrolled

2,822

2.1

Transferred to GED

6,457

4.7

Dropped Out

13,197

9.7

Total

136,055

100.0

 

Rates for the Identified High Schools

The analyses of the 2000 cohort data submitted in December 2004 were intended primarily to provide improved estimates of cohort graduation and dropout rates at the total public, New York City and rest of State levels.  In calculating the school graduation rates for the 135 identified schools, we only included students who met the criteria for membership in the school accountability graduation rate cohort.  Students who did not meet these criteria were included only in the calculation of district-level graduation rates.

In doing the analyses of 2005 STEP data, we have anticipated the cohort definition which will be used for graduation-rate accountability beginning with the 2003 cohort. In calculating the school-level rates, we have included all 2000 cohort members whose last enrollment record in the school showed that they had been enrolled in that school for a minimum of five months.  This procedure will provide the greatest consistency with analyses of future cohorts and provides rates that more accurately reflect the performance of each school.

Table 4 provides summary data for 127 of the 135 schools that were identified in the January 2005 Regents item. The remaining schools were closed. Almost 80 percent of these 127 schools were in New York City. The five-year average graduation rate of these schools was substantially lower than the total public graduation rate (56.4 percent compared with 71.3 percent).  Similarly these schools had substantially higher percentages of students who dropped out or transferred to GED programs than all public high schools. On the positive side, 11.2 percent of students in these schools were still enrolled five years after first entering grade 9 and therefore may have graduated at a later date.  The attached school-level data shows that some of the identified schools had five-year graduation rates higher than the State average.


Table 4

The Percentage of Students in the 2000 Group by

Outcomes as of June 30, 2005 after Five Years for 127 Selected High Schools

Outcomes as of June 30, 2005

Total Public

Number

Percent

Regents/Local Diploma

22,658

56.4

IEP Diploma

958

2.4

Enrolled

4,479

11.2

Transferred to GED

3,471

8.6

Dropped Out

8,586

21.4

Total

40,152

100.0

 

Demographic and Resource Characteristics of Identified Schools and All Public Schools

Table 5 compares the demographic characteristics of all high schools with the identified schools. The pattern of performance, demographics, and resources in the identified schools corresponds with the relationship among these variables documented annually in the Report to the Governor and the Legislature on the Educational Status of the State’s Schools (the Chapter 655 Report). These schools have more at-risk students and fewer resources than higher-performing schools. The comparison shows that the identified schools serve students who are more likely to be eligible for subsidized lunches, to be disabled, to be limited English proficient, and to have repeated grade 9 than students in the typical public high school. The greater risk factors of these students are not matched with greater resources to meet their needs. In fact, all identified schools are in districts that have high student needs in relation to district ability to raise resources locally. Students in these schools are more likely than other students to be taught by teachers without appropriate certification; they have fewer books and computers per 100 students.

 

Table 5

Demographic Characteristics of Selected High Schools and All High Schools in 2003-04

Characteristic

Selected

All

Percent Eligible for FRPL

60

34

Percent Disabled

14.5

13.1

Percent Limited English Proficient

14.2

5.8

Percent Repeating Grade 9

24

15.3

Student Stability

96

98

Percent certified teachers

79

92

Books per 100 Students

1,180

1,452

Computers per 100 students

13

24

Suspension Rate

7.7%

8.1%

 


Appendix A

 

Schools with Graduation Rates Below 70 Percent That Are in Improvement Status and/or SURR Status Under the Accountability System (Alternative High Schools Were Eliminated From This List)

DISTRICT NAME

SCHOOL NAME

CLOSED IN 2005-06

Buffalo City

Bennett High School

 

 

Burgard Vocational High School

 

 

Grover Cleveland High School

 

 

Lafayette High School

 

 

Riverside Institute Of Technology

 

 

Seneca Vocational High School

 

 

South Park High School

 

Rochester City

Alternative Education Center At Lofton

Closed

 

East High School

 

 

Edison Technical & Occupational Educational Center

Closed

 

John Marshall

 

 

School Without Walls

 

Amsterdam City

Amsterdam High School

 

Hempstead

Hempstead High School

 

Roosevelt

Roosevelt High School

 

Freeport

Freeport High School

 

NYC District # 1

C M S P - Marte Valle Secondary School

 

NYC District # 2

Art and Design High School

 

 

CES Vanguard High School

 

 

Chelsea Vocational High School

 

 

High School Communication Graphic Art

 

 

High School For The Humanities

 

 

Humanities Preparatory School

 

 

Legacy School For Integrated Studies

 

 

Manhattan Comprehensive Night High School

 

 

New York City Outreach Centers

Closed

 

Norman Thomas High School

 

 

Park West High School

 

 

Repertory School

 

 

School For The Physical City

 

 

Seward Park High School

 

 

Washington Irving High School

 

NYC District # 3

Louis D. Brandeis High School

 

 

Martin Luther King High School

Closed

 

Wadleigh Arts High School

 

NYC District # 4

Central Park East Secondary School

 

 

Park East High School

 

 

Urban Peace Academy

 

NYC District # 5

Bread & Roses Integrated Arts High School

 

NYC District # 7

Alfred E. Smith Vocational High School

 

 

Health Opportunities Program

 

 

Samuel Gompers Vocational High School

 

 

South Bronx High School

Closed

NYC District # 8

Adlai E. Stevenson High School

 

NYC District # 8

New School For Arts And Sciences

 

NYC District # 9

Morris High School

Closed

 

William H. Taft High School

 

NYC District #10

De Witt Clinton High School

 

 

Grace H. Dodge Vocational High School

 

 

John F. Kennedy High School

 

 

Theodore Roosevelt High School

 

 

University Heights High School

 

 

Walton High School

 

NYC District #11

Christopher Columbus High School

 

 

Evander Childs High School

 

 

Herbert H. Lehman High School

 

NYC District #12

Bronx Coalition Community High School

 

 

Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom School

 

 

High School Of World Cultures

 

 

Monroe Academy For Business & Law

 

 

Monroe Academy For Visual Arts & Design

 

 

Wings Academy

 

NYC District #13

Acorn Community High School

 

 

Brooklyn International High School

 

 

George Westinghouse High School

 

NYC District #14

Automotive High School

 

 

El Puente Academy

 

 

Harry Van Arsdale High School

 

 

High School For Legal Studies

 

 

Progress High School

 

NYC District  #15

Cobble Hill School For American Studies

 

 

John Jay High School

Closed

 

School For Global Studies

 

NYC District #16

Boys & Girls High School

 

NYC District #17

Erasmus Campus - Science/Math

 

 

Erasmus Campus - Business /Technology

 

 

Erasmus Campus-Humanities

 

 

George W. Wingate High School

 

 

Paul Robeson High School

 

 

Prospect Heights High School

 

NYC District #18

Canarsie High School

 

 

Samuel J. Tilden High School

 

 

South Shore High School

 

NYC District #19

East New York Family Academy

 

 

Franklin K. Lane High School

 

 

Thomas Jefferson High School

 

 

William H. Maxwell Vocational High School

 

NYC District #20

Fort Hamilton High School

 

 

Franklin D. Roosevelt High School

 

 

New Utrecht High School

 

NYC District #21

Abraham Lincoln High School

 

 

John Dewey High School

 

 

Lafayette High School

 

 

William E. Grady Vocational High School

 

NYC District #22

Sheepshead Bay High School

 

NYC District #23

E B C High School For Public Safety

 

NYC District #32

Bushwick High School

 

NYC District #24

Grover Cleveland High School

 

 

High School For Arts And Business

 

 

International High School At Laguardia

 

 

Middle College High School

 

 

Newtown High School

 

 

Queens Vocational High School

 

 

Robert F. Wagner Jr. Institute For Arts & Technology

 

NYC District #25

Flushing High School

 

 

John Bowne High School

 

NYC District #27

August Martin High School

 

 

Beach Channel High School

 

 

Far Rockaway High School

 

 

John Adams High School

 

 

Project Blend

Closed

 

Richmond Hill High School

 

NYC District #28

Hillcrest High School

 

 

Jamaica High School

 

NYC District #29

Business And Computer Application High School

 

 

Humanities And The Arts Magnet High School

 

 

Magnet School Of Law And Government

 

 

Math Science Research And Technical Magnet High S

 

 

Springfield Gardens High School

 

NYC District #30

Long Island City High School

 

 

William Cullen Bryant High School

 

NYC District #31

New Dorp High School

 

 

Port Richmond High School

 

 

Ralph Mckee High School

 

Syracuse City

Corcoran High School

 

 

George Fowler High School

 

 

Henninger High School

 

 

Nottingham High School

 

Wyandanch Union Free

Wyandanch Memorial High School

 

Central Islip

Central Islip Senior High School

 

Mount Vernon City

Mount Vernon High School

 

 

Nelson Mandela Community High School

 

Yonkers City

Gorton High School

 

 

Lincoln High School

 

 

Roosevelt High School

 

 

Table 1: Information on Selected Schools for the 2003-04 School Year

District Name

School Name

% Repeating Grade 9

% Free and Reduced Lunch

% of Students with Disabilities

% of Students with Limited English Proficiency

Atten-dance Rate

Suspen-sion Rate

% of Graduates Attending Post secondary

Buffalo

Bennett High School

28.1%

51.0

18.6%

0.8%

82.1

8.9%

89.4%

Buffalo

Burgard Vocational High School

30.2%

82.8

30.5%

2.9%

85.1

14.6%

88.3%

Buffalo

Grover Cleveland High School

26.1%

73.0

22.8%

27.6%

75.3

8.9%

83.8%

Buffalo

Lafayette High School

37.0%

68.5

16.2%

4.0%

86.1

43.6%

75.4%

Buffalo

Riverside Institute Of Technology

11.9%

66.3

23.1%

2.5%

82.4

6.9%

88.8%

Buffalo

Seneca Vocational High School

10.0%

63.3

17.1%

0.8%

84.7

5.3%

73.0%

Buffalo

South Park High School

38.5%

58.0

32.1%

1.1%

79.1

18.3%

64.6%

Rochester

East High School

50.7%

47.6

19.4%

8.0%

82.3

19.8%

85.9%

Rochester

John Marshall H S

21.5%

45.7

22.1%

0.4%

85.4

18.0%

74.7%

Rochester

School Without Walls

18.8%

26.3

11.4%

0.4%

92.7

14.0%

84.1%

Amsterdam

Amsterdam High School

11.2%

29.5

14.8%

2.7%

88.4

14.1%

90.0%

Hempstead UFSD

Hempstead High School

25.8%

81.8

12.0%

14.8%

83.4

13.5%

61.9%

Roosevelt UFSD

Roosevelt High School

2.2%

100.0

11.3%

6.5%

85.0

6.5%

63.3%

Freeport UFSD

Freeport High School

22.6%

24.5

10.6%

8.1%

89.8

13.9%

68.2%

New York City CSD # 1

C M S P - Marte Valle Secondary School

20.0%

83.9

28.7%

14.4%

87.7

8.4%

91.2%

New York City CSD # 2

Legacy School For Integrated Studies

24.6%

80.5

14.9%

9.1%

81.1

1.9%

74.3%

New York City CSD # 2

High School For The Humanities

34.1%

70.6

11.4%

27.4%

80.0

10.1%

29.5%

New York City CSD # 2

Seward Park High School

NA 

NA 

18.1%

36.0%

80.7

10.0%

NA 

New York City CSD # 2

Ces Vanguard High School

9.6%

78.4

19.0%

8.5%

78.4

1.0%

NA

New York City CSD # 2

Washington Irving High School

25.2%

80.5

9.0%

17.5%

78.9

6.5%

70.0%

New York City CSD # 2

Repertory School

7.4%

85.6

14.0%

3.2%

77.2

3.6%

NA

New York City CSD # 2

Park West High School

NA 

NA 

17.3%

16.2%

74.1

2.8%

NA 

New York City CSD # 2

Manhattan Comprehensive Night HS

66.7%

90.0

NA

NA

82.9

30.0%

49.5%

New York City CSD # 2

Humanities Preparatory School

19.0%

44.0

15.8%

2.2%

83.9

4.9%

85.7%

New York City CSD # 2

Chelsea Vocational High School

29.7%

90.8

18.2%

6.8%

80.1

17.6%

83.2%

New York City CSD # 2

Norman Thomas High School

36.0%

92.6

13.9%

21.6%

83.1

2.9%

67.7%

New York City CSD # 2

High School Communication Graphic Art

29.4%

66.1

15.4%

15.8%

77.4

6.4%

51.4%

New York City CSD # 2

Art And Design High School

7.5%

70.4

11.1%

3.9%

90.8

4.4%

1.6%

New York City CSD # 2

School For The Physical City

20.2%

45.4

14.8%

3.4%

87.0

9.3%

50.0%

New York City CSD # 3

Wadleigh Arts High School

9.4%

91.5

14.6%

7.3%

85.6

5.0%

NA

New York City CSD # 3

Louis D. Brandeis High School

NA 

79.9

13.2%

21.8%

76.2

13.2%

72.8%

New York City CSD # 4

Park East High School

6.8%

74.3

12.4%

9.2%

81.2

0.6%

68.8%

New York City CSD # 4

Central Park East Secondary School

28.9%

56.4

17.2%

4.4%

80.6

2.7%

NA

New York City CSD # 4

Urban Peace Academy

10.5%

99.4

17.1%

3.9%

82.2

0.0%

66.7%

New York City CSD # 5

Bread & Roses Integrated Arts HS

12.7%

90.0

20.1%

6.0%

81.0

1.1%

67.1%

New York City CSD # 7

Alfred E. Smith Vocational High School

NA 

NA 

22.6%

10.2%

81.9

5.9%

NA 

New York City CSD # 7

Samuel Gompers Vocational HS

17.6%

96.1

19.0%

11.9%

85.3

13.7%

74.0%

New York City CSD # 7

Health Opportunities Program

12.4%

79.0

8.5%

4.9%

93.9

1.0%

5.6%

New York City CSD # 8

Adlai E. Stevenson High School

26.6%

98.1

17.6%

15.1%

75.2

12.8%

90.5%

New York City CSD # 8

New School For Arts And Sciences

15.3%

99.8

29.3%

12.8%

76.0

3.7%

64.3%

New York City CSD # 9

William H. Taft High School

NA 

NA 

18.5%

20.0%

66.0

16.8%

NA 

New York City CSD #10

Walton High School

30.4%

89.8

19.3%

32.4%

79.5

4.6%

5.0%

New York City CSD #10

Theodore Roosevelt High School

NA 

NA 

21.4%

22.3%

69.8

5.9%

NA 

New York City CSD #10

De Witt Clinton High School

14.5%

96.6

12.7%

15.6%

85.2

1.4%

97.5%

New York City CSD #10

John F. Kennedy High School

29.5%

84.0

15.0%

20.2%

77.8

6.0%

60.4%

New York City CSD #10

University Heights High School

23.5%

87.4

14.8%

11.4%

79.9

8.5%

57.5%

New York City CSD #10

Grace H. Dodge Vocational High School

26.5%

89.7

19.7%

10.3%

82.2

9.3%

6.2%

New York City CSD #11

Herbert H. Lehman High School

22.0%

62.1

13.7%

8.1%

86.7

1.7%

65.4%

New York City CSD #11

Christopher Columbus High School

21.9%

69.0

14.8%

16.9%

80.7

4.2%

40.0%

New York City CSD #11

Evander Childs High School

25.2%

96.1

20.3%

11.6%

72.8

6.4%

52.6%

New York City CSD #12

High School Of World Cultures

27.8%

96.3

0.3%

91.0%

89.0

0.0%

15.2%

New York City CSD #12

Bronx Coalition Community High School

18.7%

89.6

19.3%

14.0%

81.2

6.4%

3.2%

New York City CSD #12

Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom School

5.2%

98.9

20.4%

11.2%

83.1

5.8%

97.0%

New York City CSD #12

Wings Academy

2.2%

89.5

15.8%

6.3%

85.1

3.7%

71.2%

New York City CSD #12

Monroe Academy For Business & Law

27.3%

83.5

18.9%

9.3%

77.5

3.7%

34.0%

New York City CSD #12

Monroe Academy For Visual Arts & Design

19.0%

70.1

17.7%

15.5%

84.1

10.2%

17.3%

New York City CSD #13

Brooklyn International High School

6.7%

70.3

1.2%

86.0%

94.7

7.0%

98.6%

New York City CSD #13

Acorn Community High School

19.5%

87.6

16.5%

3.8%

80.3

12.6%

69.1%

New York City CSD #13

George Westinghouse High School

24.4%

55.7

19.0%

4.1%

75.3

6.2%

66.2%

New York City CSD #14

Progress High School

10.5%

72.7

16.4%

16.0%

83.9

0.9%

65.2%

New York City CSD #14

High School For Legal Studies

14.1%

68.8

16.5%

6.5%

83.1

5.1%

66.7%

New York City CSD #14

Automotive High School

18.2%

97.0

24.9%

6.0%

77.6

15.9%

66.7%

New York City CSD #14

Harry Van Arsdale High School

15.2%

79.1

18.5%

10.3%

73.2

7.8%

94.8%

New York City CSD #14

El Puente Academy

19.0%

76.5

27.8%

14.8%

85.8

4.3%

83.3%

New York City CSD  #15

School For Global Studies

16.3%

51.8

22.0%

4.8%

89.7

9.9%

87.9%

New York City CSD  #15

Cobble Hill School For American Studies

NA 

77.7

17.1%

4.8%

78.4

1.8%

67.8%

New York City CSD #16

Boys & Girls High School

0.1%

52.0

14.3%

2.2%

78.9

0.7%

64.7%

New York City CSD #17

Prospect Heights High School

76.7%

79.4

10.8%

11.2%

77.1

2.3%

57.9%

New York City CSD #17

Erasmus  Campus - Science/Math

NA 

NA 

7.1%

24.4%

82.1

6.0%

NA 

New York City CSD #17

Erasmus Campus-Humanities

NA 

NA 

13.3%

9.3%

78.6

5.8%

NA 

New York City CSD #17

George W. Wingate High School

93.3%

46.4

12.7%

13.0%

78.9

2.3%

69.6%

New York City CSD #17

Erasmus Campus - Business /Technology

NA 

NA 

13.4%

7.9%

81.8

7.9%

NA 

New York City CSD #17

Paul Robeson High School

20.4%

83.4

12.9%

1.9%

85.0

3.4%

85.7%

New York City CSD #18

Samuel J. Tilden High School

23.9%

24.8

12.6%

8.5%

82.2

11.2%

86.6%

New York City CSD #18

Canarsie High School

22.2%

22.0

15.1%

4.9%

84.5

5.6%

83.8%

New York City CSD #18

South Shore High School

28.3%

21.5

14.6%

5.7%

81.0

9.3%

36.8%

New York City CSD #19

East New York Family Academy

13.9%

55.6

11.5%

2.6%

93.0

7.0%

65.6%

New York City CSD #19

Franklin K. Lane High School

36.3%

68.1

13.1%

20.9%

74.6

7.0%

52.7%

New York City CSD #19

Thomas Jefferson High School

26.5%

99.4

18.7%

8.5%

76.3

12.4%

70.6%

New York City CSD #19

William H. Maxwell  Vocational HS l

32.5%

71.9

21.0%

5.2%

79.3

9.7%

58.8%

New York City CSD #20

New Utrecht High School

19.8%

69.0

13.2%

19.0%

84.1

1.0%

61.5%

New York City CSD #20

Fort Hamilton High School

23.3%

46.4

10.1%

23.7%

87.7

2.4%

75.0%

New York City CSD #20

Franklin D. Roosevelt High School

20.6%

66.1

10.5%

33.9%

87.5

5.4%

68.7%

New York City CSD #21

Lafayette High School

38.7%

81.0

11.8%

24.7%

78.5

7.4%

56.8%

New York City CSD #21

Abraham Lincoln High School

21.9%

44.6

11.6%

13.1%

81.3

3.9%

56.2%

New York City CSD #21

John Dewey High School

21.4%

43.9

9.5%

15.5%

88.0

5.9%

76.6%

New York City CSD #21

William E. Grady Vocational High School

24.1%

80.9

20.2%

2.5%

84.3

6.0%

66.1%

New York City CSD #22

Sheepshead Bay High School

23.6%

23.5

11.8%

12.4%

84.2

9.9%

76.3%

New York City CSD #23

E B C High School For Public Safety

15.9%

76.0

14.8%

8.7%

78.1

12.6%

100.0%

New York City CSD #32

Bushwick High School

NA 

NA 

20.7%

28.4%

76.5

3.9%

NA 

New York City CSD #24

Newtown High School

28.2%

29.1

8.9%

34.8%

84.0

5.9%

81.4%

New York City CSD #24

Grover Cleveland High School

21.1%

43.8

10.7%

20.4%

80.6

2.8%

80.9%

New York City CSD #24

Middle College High School

2.7%

80.0

8.7%

4.4%

86.5

1.4%

54.5%

New York City CSD #24

International High School At Laguardia

43.4%

88.0

0.7%

70.9%

93.7

2.6%

NA

New York City CSD #24

High School For Arts And Business

31.4%

90.1

11.8%

26.4%

88.1

7.5%

72.9%

New York City CSD #24

Robert F. Wagner Jr. Institute For Arts & Technology

14.9%

64.8

8.8%

3.4%

84.9

18.9%

3.3%

New York City CSD #24

Queens Vocational High School

23.2%

40.2

18.0%

12.5%

84.7

8.6%

66.0%

New York City CSD #25

John Bowne High School

31.8%

48.4

8.8%

26.1%

83.7

7.6%

67.3%

New York City CSD #25

Flushing High School

40.0%

66.1

8.6%

27.5%

81.5

5.1%

86.9%

New York City CSD #27

August Martin High School

17.2%

20.9

16.3%

3.2%

80.0

11.7%

27.6%

New York City CSD #27

Beach Channel High School

23.3%

94.6

15.3%

4.6%

81.8

14.8%

58.7%

New York City CSD #27

Far Rockaway High School

31.5%

69.9

18.7%

8.0%

79.6

17.1%

61.2%

New York City CSD #27

Richmond Hill High School

23.0%

37.0

11.4%

16.0%

79.2

5.9%

77.4%

New York City CSD #27

John Adams High School

30.3%

73.1

10.7%

8.2%

80.4

8.7%

28.3%

New York City CSD #28

Jamaica High School

25.6%

24.6

10.0%

11.0%

83.5

14.0%

20.4%

New York City CSD #28

Hillcrest High School

23.0%

67.9

9.3%

13.1%

84.1

1.4%

71.6%

New York City CSD #29

Springfield Gardens High School

24.9%

19.3

14.0%

6.8%

81.6

4.9%

47.6%

New York City CSD #29

Math Science Research & Technical Magnet HS

12.2%

35.5

7.0%

2.6%

86.5

10.0%

87.0%

New York City CSD #29

Magnet School Of Law And Government

14.6%

26.6

6.6%

0.6%

84.8

11.7%

8.2%

New York City CSD #29

Business And Computer Application HS

14.3%

14.4

13.8%

2.6%

83.6

9.5%

NA

New York City CSD #29

Humanities And The Arts Magnet HS

29.1%

25.4

11.3%

3.0%

83.3

11.3%

58.6%

New York City CSD #30

William Cullen Bryant High School

25.3%

32.4

10.0%

26.7%

84.2

5.3%

86.6%

New York City CSD #30

Long Island City High School

24.1%

73.8

11.7%

14.6%

81.5

4.8%

64.7%

New York City CSD #31

New Dorp High School

18.9%

35.9

14.8%

6.2%

84.0

5.7%

78.8%

New York City CSD #31

Port Richmond High School

21.0%

33.6

13.6%

3.8%

84.7

3.9%

81.5%

New York City CSD #31

Ralph Mckee High School

12.5%

51.7

29.6%

2.9%

84.5

16.2%

57.7%

Syracuse

Corcoran High School

25.7%

46.8

20.4%

0.0%

93.7

12.6%

100.0%

Syracuse

Nottingham High School

27.3%

43.1

19.3%

9.7%

89.9

2.2%

100.0%

Syracuse

Henninger High School

28.8%

49.9

12.9%

0.0%

92.9

9.7%

100.0%

Syracuse

George Fowler High School

32.3%

64.5

8.4%

0.0%

89.7

14.7%

100.0%

Wyandanch UFSD

Wyandanch Memorial High School

4.6%

37.7

19.5%

8.6%

94.9

40.8%

77.8%

Central Islip UFSD

Central Islip Senior High School

0.4%

27.6

14.9%

7.3%

90.2

10.4%

73.3%

Mount Vernon

Mount Vernon High School

17.1%

20.1

16.2%

3.6%

85.1

19.5%

79.7%

Mount Vernon

Nelson Mandela Community High School

54.5%

13.0

0.0%

0.0%

83.0

2.7%

91.4%

Yonkers

Gorton High School

23.0%

81.4

18.1%

6.5%

91.8

9.0%

93.9%

Yonkers

Lincoln High School

33.1%

77.8

20.2%

10.2%

84.7

18.9%

67.9%

Yonkers

Roosevelt High School

37.7%

73.9

15.3%

20.0%

79.9

26.7%

61.6%

 


Table 2:  Information on Selected Schools for the 2003-04 School Year

District Name

School Name

Number of Books per 100 Students

Number of Computers per 100 Students

Student Stability Rate

% Certified Teacher

Teacher Median Years of Experience

Buffalo

Bennett High School

275

11

70

88.7%

7

Buffalo

Burgard Vocational High School

785

30

99

90.7%

9

Buffalo

Grover Cleveland High School

357

25

86

89.2%

19

Buffalo

Lafayette High School

637

21

97

89.8%

14

Buffalo

Riverside Institute Of Technology

458

32

48

88.1%

11

Buffalo

Seneca Vocational High School

607

28

100

91.4%

12

Buffalo

South Park High School

348

18

95

100.0%

16

Rochester

East High School

1,103

20

95

84.6%

9

Rochester

John Marshall H S

692

11

99

80.6%

9

Rochester

School Without Walls

3,843

33

100

88.2%

17

Amsterdam

Amsterdam High School

1,166

25

100

98.8%

17

Hempstead UFSD

Hempstead High School

988

56

97

96.1%

13

Roosevelt UFSD

Roosevelt High School

1,435

21

94

97.1%

13

Freeport UFSD

Freeport High School

840

20

97

95.4%

14

New York City CSD # 1

C M S P - Marte Valle Secondary School

787

NA

102

73.0%

5

New York City CSD # 2

Legacy School For Integrated Studies

NA

17

NA

NA 

NA 

New York City CSD # 2

High School For The Humanities

705

8

100

87.3%

15

New York City CSD # 2

Seward Park High School

NA 

NA 

NA 

79.5%

19

New York City CSD # 2

Ces Vanguard High School

4,218

NA

NA

NA 

NA 

New York City CSD # 2

Washington Irving High School

387

3

99

70.9%

7

New York City CSD # 2

Repertory School

NA

NA

NA

NA 

NA 

New York City CSD # 2

Park West High School

NA 

NA 

NA 

84.3%

17

New York City CSD # 2

Manhattan Comprehensive Night HS

NA

1,240

NA 

NA 

11

New York City CSD # 2

Humanities Preparatory School

8,247

68

94

77.8%

6

New York City CSD # 2

Chelsea Vocational High School

471

NA

100

78.1%

8

New York City CSD # 2

Norman Thomas High School

736

12

100

86.0%

11

New York City CSD # 2

High School Communication Graphic Art

414

20

103

75.5%

11

New York City CSD # 2

Art And Design High School

606

NA

97

73.1%

18

New York City CSD # 2

School For The Physical City

617

22

NA

70.6%

6

New York City CSD # 3

Wadleigh Arts High School

4,392

26

97

68.2%

8

New York City CSD # 3

Louis D. Brandeis High School

456

5

99

75.7%

7

New York City CSD # 4

Park East High School

NA

NA

NA

65.2%

4

New York City CSD # 4

Central Park East Secondary School

NA

NA

NA

82.4%

3

New York City CSD # 4

Urban Peace Academy

NA

26

98

58.3%

5

New York City CSD # 5

Bread & Roses Integrated Arts HS

NA

19

100

72.7%

6

New York City CSD # 7

Alfred E. Smith Vocational High School

NA 

NA 

NA 

83.6%

8

New York City CSD # 7

Samuel Gompers Vocational HS

300

NA

100

69.9%

7

New York City CSD # 7

Health Opportunities Program

769

10

98

91.7%

6

New York City CSD # 8

Adlai E. Stevenson High School

1,359

9

94

79.3%

11

New York City CSD # 8

New School For Arts And Sciences

197

24

NA

75.6%

6

New York City CSD # 9

William H. Taft High School

NA 

NA 

NA 

75.0%

20

New York City CSD #10

Walton High School

596

10

90

79.6%

10

New York City CSD #10

Theodore Roosevelt High School

NA 

NA 

NA 

80.4%

15

New York City CSD #10

De Witt Clinton High School

879

NA

98

84.3%

15

New York City CSD #10

John F. Kennedy High School

1,357

9

94

82.7%

15

New York City CSD #10

University Heights High School

728

20

NA

65.0%

11

New York City CSD #10

Grace H. Dodge Vocational High School

594

15

100

90.8%

10

New York City CSD #11

Herbert H. Lehman High School

857

12

99

70.1%

6

New York City CSD #11

Christopher Columbus High School

1,060

8

100

78.7%

8

New York City CSD #11

Evander Childs High School

NA

NA

100

NA 

NA 

New York City CSD #12

High School Of World Cultures

435

14

NA

42.9%

10

New York City CSD #12

Bronx Coalition Community High School

1,367

10

NA

66.7%

3

New York City CSD #12

Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom School

968

26

NA

32.1%

5

New York City CSD #12

Wings Academy

60

25

NA

81.3%

7

New York City CSD #12

Monroe Academy For Business & Law

2,611

9

NA

91.7%

6

New York City CSD #12

Monroe Academy For Visual Arts & Design

2,629

17